Daily Devotional – Ezra’s Prayer

5. Confession and Repentance (Ezra 7-10). Rebuild & Renew: The Post-Exilic  Books, by Ralph F. Wilson. JesusWalk Bible Study Series.
Gustav Dore, detail from ‘Ezra in Prayer’ (1866), engraving, from La Grande Bible de Tours.

EZRA 9 


CONTEXT 

There are two books in the Bible dedicated to Israel’s return from Babylonian captivity to rebuild the Temple in Jerusalem. Ezra is the first with Nehemiah by the decree of Artaxerxes, quickly following. 

Ezra covers a period of approximately 100 years beginning around 538 B.C. The book’s primary purpose is to record the rebuilding of the Temple but it also includes many birth records apparently to establishing the priesthood lineage of Arron.  Ezra can be divided as follows:

Chapters 1-6—Return and Building of the Second Temple.

Chapters 7-10—The Ministry of Ezra. 

Today’s devotional is from Chapter 9 and has this as it’s the theme: 

Believers today can be encouraged to be as zealous for the upbuilding of the church as Ezra and Nehemiah were for the rebuilding of the temple and wall. – KATHLEEN NIELSON

 


DEVOTION

 

READ THE BIBLE From the Gospel Coalition 

It may be difficult for some Christians, immersed in the heritage of individualism and influenced by postmodern relativism, to find much sympathy for Ezra and his prayer (Ezra 9). A hundred or so of the returned Israelites, out of a population that by this time would have been at least fifty or sixty thousand, have married pagan women from the surrounding tribes. Ezra treats this as an unmitigated disaster and weeps before the Lord as if really grievous harm has been done. Has religion descended to the level where it tells its adherents whom they may marry? Moreover, the aftermath of this prayer (on which we shall reflect tomorrow) is pretty heartless, isn’t it?

In reality, Ezra’s prayer discloses a man who has thought long and hard about Israel’s history.

First, he understands what brought about the exile, the formal destruction of the nation, the scattering of the people. It was nothing other than the sins of the people—and terribly often these sins had been fostered by links, not least marital links, between the people of the covenant and the surrounding tribes. “Because of our sins, we and our kings and our priests have been subjected to the sword and captivity, to pillage and humiliation at the hand of foreign kings, as it is today” (Ezra 9:7).

Second, he understands that if this community has been permitted to return to Judah, it is because “for a brief moment, the LORD our God has been gracious in leaving us a remnant and giving us a firm place in his sanctuary, and so our God gives light to our eyes and a little relief in our bondage” (Ezra 9:8).

Third, he understands that in the light of the first two points, and in the light of Scripture’s explicit prohibition against intermarriage, what has taken place is not only singular ingratitude but concrete defiance of the God who has come to Israel’s relief not only in the Exodus but also in the exile.

Fourth, he understands the complex, corrosive, corporate nature of sin. Like Isaiah before him (Isa. 6:5), Ezra aligns himself with the people in their sin (Ezra 9:6). He grasps the stubborn fact that these are not individual failures and nothing more; these are means by which raw paganism, and finally the relativizing of Almighty God, are smuggled into the entire community through the back door. How could such marriages, even among some priests, have been arranged unless many, many others had given their approval, or at least winked at the exercise? Above all, Ezra understands that the sins of the people of God are far worse than the punishment they have received (Ezra 9:13–15).

How should these lines of thought shape our thinking about the sins of the people of God today?


APPLICATION / PRAYER

In reading today’s devotional I realized I have not been an Ezra or Nehemiah (one of my favorite OT characters) as of late when it comes to me and my local church. Oh, I have lots of excuses, illness, and such but really how much weight do those excuses hold. 

Join me today in praying for the local church, that it may be strong, uninfluenced by worldly affairs, and edifying to all the saints it ministers to. 

 

Lord, let your Spirit be poured out upon your churches from on high, and then the wilderness shall become a fruitful field; Isaiah 32:15(ESV) then justice shall return to the righteous, and all the upright in heart will follow it. Psalm 94:15(ESV)

Let what remains be put into order, Titus 1:5(ESV), and let every plant that is not of my heavenly Father’s planting be rooted up. Matthew 15:13(ESV)

Let the Lord whom I seek come to his temple like a refiner’s fire and fullers’ soap, and let him purify the sons of Levi and all the seed of Israel, and refine them like gold and silver, that they may bring offerings of righteousness to the LORD, pleasing offerings to the LORD as in the days of old, as in former years. Malachi 3:2-4(ESV)

Let religion that is pure and undefiled before God, the Father, flourish and prevail everywhere: James 1:27(ESV) that kingdom of God among men, which is not a matter of eating and drinking but of righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit. Romans 14:17(ESV) O revive this work in the midst of the years, in the midst of the years make it known; Habakkuk 3:2(ESV) and let these times be times of reformation. Hebrews 9:10(ESV)

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