Daily Devotional – The Beatitudes by Thomas Watson Part XXX

Image result for Beatitudes
Image Depicting Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount

The Beatitudes

by Thomas Watson

An Exposition of Matthew 5:1-12 

Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.”
“Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.”
“Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.”
“Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.”
“Blessed are the merciful, for they shall receive mercy.”
“Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.”
“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.”
“Blessed are those who are persecuted, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven

Christian Meekness (Continued) 
Remembering the overall theme is meek people are blessed people.

Meekness towards MAN; Continued:

I shall lay down several MOTIVES or arguments to meeken the spirits of men.

1. Let me propound EXAMPLES of meekness.

[1] The example of Jesus Christ. ‘Your king comes unto you meek’ (Matthew 21:5). Christ was the exemplar and pattern of meekness. ‘When he was reviled, he reviled not again’ (1 Peter 2:23). His enemies’ words were more bitter than the gall they gave him—but Christ’s words were smoother than oil. He prayed and wept for his enemies. He calls us to learn of him: ‘Learn of me, for I am meek’ (Matthew 11:29). Christ does not bid us (says Augustine) learn of him to work miracles, to open the eyes of the blind, to raise the dead—but he would have us learn of him to be meek. If we do not imitate his life—we cannot be saved by his death!

[2] Let us set before our eyes the examples of some of the saints who have shined in this grace. Moses was a man of unparalleled meekness. ‘Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men who were upon the face of the earth’ (Numbers 12:3). How many injuries did he put up? When the people of Israel murmured against him, instead of falling into a rage, he falls to prayer for them (Exodus 15:24, 25). The text says, they murmured at the waters of Marah. Sure the waters were not so bitter as the spirits of the people—but they could not provoke him to anger—but to petition. Another time when they lacked water, they fell arguing with Moses. ‘Why have brought us up out of Egypt—to kill us and our children with thirst?’ (Exodus 17:3). As if they had said, If we die we will lay our death to your charge. Would not this exasperate Moses? Surely it would have required the meekness of an angel to bear this—but behold Moses, meekness. He did not give them a harsh word! Though they were in a storm—he was in a calm. They lambaste him—but he prays. Oh that as the spirit of Elijah rested upon Elisha, so may some of the spirit of Moses, this meek man (or rather earthly angel), rest upon us!

Another eminent pattern of meekness was David. When Shimei cursed David, and Abishai, one of David’s lifeguard, would have beheaded Shimei. ‘No!’ says king David, ‘Let him alone, and let him curse’ (2 Samuel 16:11). And when Saul had wronged and abused David and it was in David’s power to have killed Saul while he was asleep, (1 Samuel 26:7, 12)—yet he would not touch Saul—but called God to be umpire (verse 23). Here was a miracle of meekness.

[3] The examples of meek heathen. Though their meekness could not properly be called grace, because it did not grow upon the right stock of faith—yet it was very beautiful in its kind. When one reviled Pericles and followed him home to his gate at night, railing upon him, he answered not a word—but commanded one of his servants to light a torch, and bring the railer home to his own house. Frederick, Duke of Saxony, when he was angry, would shut himself up in his closet and let none come near him, until he had mastered his passion. Plutarch reports of the Pythagoreans, if they argued in the day, they would embrace and be friends before sunset. Cicero, in one of his Orations, reports of Pompey the Great, that he was a man of a meek disposition. He admitted all to come to him so freely, and heard the complaints of those who were wronged so mildly, that he excelled all the princes before him. He was of that sweet temper that it was hard to say whether his enemies more feared his valor, or his subjects loved his meekness. Julius Caesar not only forgave Brutus and Cassius, his enemies—but advanced them. He thought himself most honored by acts of mercy and meekness. Did the spring-head of nature rise so high, and shall not grace rise higher? Shall we debase faith below reason? Let us write according to these fair copies.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.