Heartbroken Gold Star Father Asks Devastating Question Biden Can’t Answer

It is frustrating to be in a 20 year war and the same Islamic terrorist be in charge in the end. We (veterans) know we do not fight to the idiot politicians, most of whom could not fight their way out of a paper bag. We fought for our brothers and sisters who stood beside us. Those who like us volunteered to defend America from terrorists. The fact that the politicians failed us is; the sad reality of the situation. – Mike


Wyoming is the least-populous U.S. state — and yet, it was home to one of the first and one of the last American service members killed in the war in Afghanistan…

Source: Heartbroken Gold Star Father Asks Devastating Question Biden Can’t Answer

2021 National Veteran Suicide Prevention Report shows decrease in Veteran suicides

suicide prevention report 2021

VA’s latest data from 2019 shows a decrease in suicide among Veterans from the year prior. The decrease, reflecting the lowest number of Veteran suicides since 2007, provides hope and motivation for continued prevention efforts. 

SOURCE: 2021 National Veteran Suicide Prevention Annual Report shows decrease in Veteran suicides

Operation Gratitude 9/11 digital letter writing campaign

United

Write a 9/11 Thank You note today

In honor of the 20th Anniversary of 9/11 and National Day of Service, Operation Gratitude invites you to write a thank you note to first responders, service members and Veterans.

Please take 5 minutes to write a letter today through the Operation Gratitude digital platform HERE.

Veteran Suicide Prevention

You don’t need to be an expert to make a difference—support Veterans by sharing these materials with your own networks to raise awareness about Veteran suicide prevention.

Nearly 90 retired generals and admirals call on Gen. Milley and Gen. Austin to resign over Afghanistan disaster

Blaze Media

A group of nearly 90 retired generals and admirals called for the resignations of the secretary of defense and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff over the disaster of the U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan…

SOURCE: Read more

4 Keys to What’s Next in Afghanistan as 13 US Service Members Die in Attacks

“The Biden administration has created a massive hostage situation,” says Heritage Foundation’s Jim Phillips. “Even if the Taliban doesn’t take hostages, they will not do a lot to protect the Americans…

SOURCE: 4 Keys to What’s Next in Afghanistan as 13 US Service Members Die in Attacks


Nancy Pelosi’s grotesque behavior after the bomb in Kabul was for a reason

WATCH: Joe Biden Admits: “They Gave Me A List” of Who “I Was Instructed To Call On”

Kill list: Biden’s team hands American and Afghani names to the Taliban

Call Afghanistan What It Is… Also Pray for Afghanistan

As many as 80,000 desperate people still need to be evacuated from behind enemy lines—thousands of U.S. citizens and tens of thousands of Afghans who risked their lives for years to help U.S. troops.

Call Afghanistan What It Is: The Worst Hostage Crisis in American History

On Nov. 4, 1979, militants seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, taking more than 60 American hostages. It was hell for the captured Americans, and Jimmy Carter’s inability to extricate them helped doom him to a one-term presidency.

The way things are shaping up in Kabul, that national humiliation is being recreated on a far, far bigger scale—it is no hyperbole to say that it is starting to look like America’s worst hostage crisis…

SOURCE: Call Afghanistan What It Is: The Worst Hostage Crisis in American History


Praying for Afghanistan – Family Research Council

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Today, as we write this, our hearts are heavy. The Taliban takeover of Afghanistan is producing untold human tragedies. Desperate scenes at the Kabul airport — and the violence erupting across Afghanistan that Western media does not see — portray an international tragedy of immense proportion.

And for some 10,000 to 12,000 Afghan Christians, whose numbers have grown as they’ve worshipped in small, underground groups, this is a life-and-death emergency. They are being specifically and openly targeted by the Taliban.

These troubling events are a call to prayer. Family Research Council has been tracking the situation in Afghanistan, and we ask you to join us as we intercede for our endangered sisters and brothers there. For more on what’s happening and how you can pray, please see the following resources:

The sobering religious freedom lesson of Afghanistan by Tony Perkins and Travis Weber

Afghan Christians Are Facing a Taliban Reign of Terror by Lela Gilbert

Explainer: What the Taliban Takeover Means for Afghan Believers by Arielle Del Turco and Tyler Watt

“They Need a Miracle”: Pray for the People of Afghanistan by Arielle Del Turco

5 Ways to Pray for the People of Afghanistan by Arielle Del Turco

General Jerry Boykin Discusses the Fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban

VETERANS ARE NOT ALONE

The pictures below are strikingly similar and tragic, and many are asking the question how could this great nation repeat the failure of 46 years ago?

Photo Taken Amid Embassy Evacuation Some Call Biden's 'Saigon Moment' Is  Striking

Taken Amid Embassy Evacuation Some Call Biden’s ‘Saigon Moment’ Is Striking 14 Aug 2021 -Business – InsiderPhoto

Fall of Saigon Anniversary: How U.S. Managed Its Vietnam Failure | The New  Republic

Evacuation of US Embassy Saigon 29 April 1975 – NY Daily News

The following is from the Veterans Administration and offers some good counsel for fo those who served in Afgan, or any theater for that matter, I pray it will be of help to you or someone you know:

Veterans may question the meaning of their service or whether it was worth the sacrifices they made. They may feel more moral distress about experiences they had during their service. It’s normal to feel this way. Talk with your friends and families, reach out to battle buddies, connect with a peer-to-peer network, or sign up for mental health services. Scroll down for a list of common reactions and coping advice.

Common Reactions

In reaction to current events in Afghanistan, Veterans may:

  • Feel frustrated, sad, helpless, grief or distressed
  • Feel angry or betrayed
  • Experience an increase in mental health symptoms like symptoms of PTSD or depression
  • Sleep poorly, drink more or use more drugs 
  • Try to avoid all reminders or media or shy away from social situations
  • Have more military and homecoming memories

Veterans may question the meaning of their service or whether it was worth the sacrifices they made. They may feel more moral distress about experiences they had during their service.

Veterans may feel like they need to expect and/or prepare for the worst. For example, they may:

  • Become overly protective, vigilant, and guarded
  • Become preoccupied by danger
  • Feel a need to avoid being shocked by, or unprepared for, what may happen in the future

Feeling distressed is a normal reaction to negative events, especially ones that feel personal. It can be helpful to let yourself feel those feelings rather than try to avoid them. Often, these feelings will naturally run their course. If they continue without easing up or if you feel overwhelmed by them, the suggestions below can be helpful.

Strategies for Managing Ongoing Distress

At this moment, it may seem like all is lost, like your service or your sacrifices were for nothing. Consider the ways that your service made a difference, the impact it had on others’ lives, or on your own life. Remember that now is just one moment in time and that things will continue to change.

It can be helpful to focus on the present and to engage in the activities that are most meaningful and valuable to you. Is there something you can do today that is important to you?  This can be as an individual, a family member, a parent, or a community member. Something that is meaningful to you in regard to your work or your spirituality? Such activities won’t change the past or the things you can’t control, but they can help life feel meaningful and reduce distress, despite the things you cannot change.

It can also help to consider your thinking. Ask yourself if your thoughts are helpful to you right now. Are there ways you can change your thinking to be more accurate and less distressing? For example, are you using extreme thinking where you see the situation as all bad or all good?  If so, try and think in less extreme terms. For example, rather than thinking “my service in Afghanistan was useless” consider instead “I helped keep Afghanistan safe.”

Finally, consider more general coping strategies that you may want to try including:

  • Engage in Positive Activities. Try to engage in positive, healthy, or meaningful activities, even if they are small, simple actions. Doing things that are rewarding, meaningful, or enjoyable, even if you don’t feel like it, can make you feel better.
  • Stay Connected. Spend time with people who give you a sense of security, calm, or happiness, or those who best understand what you are going through.
  • Practice Good Self Care. Look for positive coping strategies that help you manage your emotions. Listening to music, exercising, practicing breathing routines, spending time in nature or with animals, journaling, or reading inspirational text are some simple ways to help manage overwhelming or distressing emotions.
  • Stick to Your Routines. It can be helpful to stick to a schedule for when you sleep, eat, work, and do other day-to-day activities.
  • Limit Media Exposure. Limit how much news you take in if media coverage is increasing your distress.
  • Use a mobile app. Consider one of VA’s self-help apps (see https://www.ptsd.va.gov/appvid/mobile/) such as PTSD Coach which has tools that can help you deal with common reactions like, stress, sadness, and anxiety. You can also track your symptoms over time.
  • PTSD Coach Online. A series of online video coaches will guide you through 17 tools to help you manage stress. PTSD Coach Online is used on a computer, rather than a mobile device, and therefore can offer tools that involve writing.

If you develop your own ways of adapting to ongoing events and situations, you may gain a stronger sense of being able to deal with challenges, a greater sense of meaning or purpose, and an ability to mentor and support others in similar situations.

Resources available right now

How Critical Race Theory Endangers America’s National Security

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In June, Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, defended the military’s study of critical race theory and said he wanted to “understand white rage.” (Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images)

I asked my parents about what they would think, theoretically, if I joined the military. As proud Americans with the utmost respect for our armed forces, I figured surely they would not have a problem with this idea.

Much to my surprise, the first words out of my mother’s mouth were, “With the way this country is headed, what will there be left to defend?”

CONTINUERD AT SOURCE: Critical Race Theory Endangers America’s National Security

What Do We Do About the Homeless?

Prager U’s New 5-Minute Video

5-Minute Video Thumbnail Image

Homelessness is one of the most vexing public policy problems we face. If you live in a big city, especially on the West Coast, you literally face it every day. And every day, it seems to get worse. Why? And what can we do about it? Christopher Rufo, a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, has answers. 

Click here to watch.