Devotional Thought for Today – 11/05/2020

One Thing (Psalm 27:4-6) - YouTube

PSALM 27

I do not thing God wants us to settle for “one thing” in our lives spiritually. I believe He expects us to reach a goal and then set a new one continually maturing and growing.  Yet the point of David’s prayer here in these verses is that his undivided focus will be on achieving the goal of, dwell[ing] in the house of the Lord [in His presence] all the days of my life, for it is  the very foundation of his faith.  David is not and neither should we be settling for one thing but focusing on on the one thing that matters most, God.

The Psalm as a whole can be broken down into 4 parts;

The poet first sounds forth his sure confidence in his God, Ps 27:1-3, and his love of communion with him, Ps 27:4-6. He then betakes himself to prayer, Ps 27:7-12, and concludes with an acknowledgment of the sustaining power of faith in his own case, and an exhortation to others to follow his example. Charles H. Spurgeon’s Treasury of David

I offer a few of the comments from Spurgeon’s Commentary for your edification: 

v.1 The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? Alice Driver, martyr, at her examination, put all the doctors to silence, so that they had not a word to say, but one looked upon another; then she said, “Have you no more to say? God be honoured, you be not able to resist the Spirit of God, in me, a poor woman. I was an honest poor man’s daughter, never brought up at the University as you have seen; but I have driven the plough many a time before my father, I thank God; yet, notwithstanding, in the defence of God’s truth, and in the cause of my Master, Christ, by his grace I will set my foot against the foot of any of you all, in the maintenance and defence of the same; and if I had a thousand lives they should go for the payment thereof.” So the Chancellor condemned her, and she returned to the prison joyful. Charles Bradbury.

v.4 One thing have I desired of the Lord, etc. Seeing David would make but one request to God, why would he not make a greater? for, alas! what a poor request is this–to desire todwell in God’s house? and what to do? but only to see? and to see what? but only a beauty, a fading thing, at most but toenquire; and what is enquiring? but only to hear news; a vain fancy. And what cause in any of these why David should make it his request to God? But mark, O my soul, what goes with it! Take altogether —to behold the beauty of the Lord and to enquire in histemple. And now tell me, if there be, if there can be, any greater request to be made? any greater cause to be earnest about it? For though worldly beauty be a fading thing, yet “the beauty of theLord, “shall continue when the world shall fade away; and though enquiring after news be a vain fancy, yet to enquire in God’sTemple is the way to learn there is no new thing under the sun, and there it was that Solomon learned that “all is vanity.” Indeed, this “one thing, “that David desires, is in effect that unumnecessarium that Christ speaks of in the gospel; which Mary makes choice of there, as David doth here. Sir Richard Baker.

The house of the Lord. It (the tabernacle, the sanctuary), is called the house of God because he is present there, as a man delights to be present in his house. It is the place where God will be met withal. As a man will be found in his house, and there he will have suitors come to him, where he reveals his secrets. A man rests, he lies, and lodgeth in his house. Where is a man so familiar as in his house? and what other place hath he such care to protect and provide for as his house? and he lays up his treasures and his jewels in his house. So God lays up all the treasures of grace and comfort in the visible church. In the church he is to be spoken with as a man in his house. There he gives us sweet meetings; there are mutual, spiritual kisses. “Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth.” So 1:2. A man’s house is his castle, as we say, that he will protect and provide for. God will be sure to protect and provide for his church. Therefore he calls the church of God, that is, the tabernacle (that was the church at that time), the house of God. If we apply it to our times, that answers the tabernacle now is particular visible churches under particular pastors, where the means of salvation are set up. Particular visible churches now are God’s tabernacle. The church of the Jews was a national church. There was but one church, but one place, and one tabernacle; but now God hath erected particular tabernacles. Every particular church and congregation under one pastor, their meeting is the church of God, a several church independent. Richard Sibbes.

I pray today you have that focus fellowship with God that David so enjoyed.

Saturday’s Military Devotional – BEING STRONG

 

Joshua 1:9

2 Timothy 2:4

AMP and RVR 1960 


CONTEXT:

This is the Apostle Paul’s second letter to his young disciple Timothy. In Chapter 1  Paul urges Timothy to guard all he has been entrusted with. Specifically the Gospel and it’s Good News of Christ.

Chapter 2 v.1-13 begins with Paul telling Timothy to be Strong. Not just any ordinary strength (in the faith) but that of a soldier for he is surely to endure many battles.


BREAKDOWN:

No soldier – This is not the first time Paul has referenced Christians as soldiers Ephesians 6:11 Put on the full armor of God [for His precepts are like the splendid armor of a heavily-armed soldier], so that you may be able to [successfully] stand up against all the schemes and the strategies and the deceits of the devil. 

gets entangled – He is making it clear then (Ephesians) and here that we are in a serious battle and we have no time for 

in civilian pursuits, outside distractions. I want to be clear that is not to say we should be ignorant of the world around you, or silent about it either (See yesterday’s devotional) Paul is making the case for our FOCUS.  

since his aim – What is the aim, goal or mission at hand? Is it to be tied up in worldly affairs while trying to Pastor a church or serve overseas missions? The obvious answer is no. 

is to please – Our aim, focus, goal, mission is always to please…

the one who enlisted him. (superiors) –  That is to be a well disciplined soldier for God 


APPLICATION:

In the military a Soldier, Marine (or any servicemember) does not obey orders and focus on the mission to “please” their superiors. They do it because discipline and training has taught them it saves lives in battle.

The same applies to the Christian soldier in their daily walk. Life’s distractions and the interloping of Satan’s minions to temp us can easily sway our focus. That is why Paul in Ephesians stresses the need to Armor Up and here encouraging Timothy to BE Strong and stay focused. 

C.H. Spurgeon said it best: 

The man who has given himself wholly to the service of Christ must not undertake any other business that would prevent his giving his whole strength to his Master’s work. 


Today’s Questions:

Say What?

Observation: What did I read? What struck you as most meaningful?

So What?

Interpretation: What does it mean? Overall and the most meaningful? Did it change your view on Being Strong?     

Now What?

Application: How does it apply to me?

Then What?

Implementation: What do I do? How can I start living it out today?

Attacking Anxiety

The following 14 Part series by John MacArthur and staff at GTY explores the biblical answers to Anxiety, Doubt and Worry. Along with  God’s Sovereignty and the Believer’s response. 

 

 

 

  1. Unshakable Peace Believers often find themselves living in contradiction to the world, and we should. The runaway anxiety and constant fear that grips so much of the world does not have the same hold on us—or at least, it shouldn’t. Over the last few weeks, we’ve been looking at anxiety from a biblical perspective, …
  2. The Only True Peace Any anxious Christian would love to have this prayer offered on his behalf: “May the Lord of peace Himself continually grant you peace in every circumstance. . . . The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you.”
  3. Casting Your Cares on God A prideful heart cannot find rest in God’s sovereignty. A person who values his or her own plans, opinions, and desires above all else has nowhere to turn when worry creeps in. In fact, pride paves the way for an anxious heart.
  4. Humility vs. Anxiety The apostle Peter was a worrier. He worried about drowning when he was walking on water, even though Jesus was right there with him (Matthew 14:29-31). He worried about what was going to happen to Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane, so he pulled out his sword and tried to take on a battalion of Roman…
  5. Replacing Worry with the Right Focus God’s Word is clear—believers are not to be given over to anxiety. But it’s not simply a cold, abrupt command to stop worrying. Scripture is clear that we shouldn’t focus on the plans, needs, and uncertainties of tomorrow, but it’s also clear about where our focus should be instead.
  6. The Folly of Worry in Light of Our Future Much of our anxiety is born out of concerns and uncertainty regarding our future. We get caught up in our plans and programs, overlooking the blessings of today and obsessing over uncontrollable details on the horizon…
  7. The Incompatibility of Faith and Anxiety If you worry, what kind of faith do you manifest? “Little faith,” according to Jesus (Matthew 6:30). If you are a child of God, you by definition have a heavenly Father. To act like you don’t, nervously asking, “What will I eat? What will I drink? What will I wear for clothing?” is to act like an un..
  8. What Flowers Teach Us About Worry God is sovereignly in control of all things. That fact alone ought to dispel much of our anxiety. And when we consider the Lord’s fatherly care for His people, we see just how foolish, unnecessary, and impotent our worry truly is.
  9. Bird Watching and Beating Worry One of the most hopeless aspects of unrepentant sinners’ lives is that they have no answer for anxiety. They’re forced to put their hopes in flimsy, fallible plans and institutions. They aren’t able to rest firmly in the unchanging promises of God—they have to ride out every wave of calamity, every …
  10. What Did Jesus Say About Worry? You probably remember the “What Would Jesus Do?” trend from the late ’90s. It seemed everywhere you looked, plastered across T-shirts, hats, jewelry, and all kinds of other merchandise, the WWJD slogan was a blithe, shallow reminder to live up to Christ’s moral code…
  11. Observing God’s Care Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s legendary detective, Sherlock Holmes, is one of the most intriguing creations of literary fiction. He is, quite simply, extraordinary. His famous cohort, Dr. John Watson, is ordinary, at least by comparison. Watson has often been erroneously portrayed as a bumbling fool, but…
  12. John MacArthur on Anxiety and God’s Sovereignty It should be clear by now that unchecked anxiety isn’t good for you. It’s a sin expressly forbidden by the Lord, so there is the spiritual cost to consider. But it’s also harmful to your health, your productivity, and your relationships. It wreaks havoc throughout your life, and as we saw yesterday,…
  13. Worn Out by Worry Worry is a common temptation for all of us. The source of the anxiety might vary from person to person, but no one is completely immune. For some, it’s even a favorite pastime, occupying large portions of their days by troubling over their doubts and fears about the future.
  14. Overwhelmed by Anxiety? Anxiety, fear, worry, and stress are familiar words in our day, and familiar experiences to many. More and more we’re hearing of an extreme form of anxiety referred to as a “panic attack.”