Devotional Thought for Today – 06/05/2021

James 1:19–20 (ESV) - James 1:19–20 ESV - Know this, my beloved… | Biblia
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James 1

CONTEXT: Matthew Henry says of this book and specifically this chapter: This epistle of James is one of the most instructive writings in the New Testament. Being chiefly directed against particular errors at that time brought in among the Jewish Christians, it does not contain the same full doctrinal statements as the other epistles, but it presents an admirable summary of the practical duties of all believers...How to apply to God under troubles, and how to behave in prosperous and in adverse circumstances. (1-11) To look upon all evil as proceeding from ourselves, and all good from God. (12-18) The duty of watching against a rash temper, and of receiving the word of God with meekness. (19-21) And of living according to thereto. (22-25) The difference between vain pretenses and real religion. (26,27)

Over the years I have written many times about anger, like many of my fellow ex-military, it is an issue I have long dealt with and writing helps remind me of the futility of angry outbursts.

Instead of more of my words here is a devotional on the matter by John MacArthur:

Be Slow to Anger

“Let everyone be . . . slow to anger; for the anger of man does not achieve the righteousness of God” (James 1:19-20).

If you resent God’s Word, you cannot grow in righteousness.

Have you ever started reading your Bible, thinking everything was fine between you and the Lord, only to have the Word suddenly cut deep into your soul to expose some sin you had neglected or tried to hide? That commonly happens because God seeks to purge sin in His children. The Holy Spirit uses the Word to penetrate the hidden recesses of the heart to do His convicting and purifying work. How you respond to that process is an indicator of the genuineness of your faith.

“Anger” in James 1:19-20 refers to a negative response to that process. It is a deep internal resentment accompanied by an attitude of rejection. Sometimes that resentment can be subtle. Paul described those who “will not endure sound doctrine; but wanting to have their ears tickled, they will accumulate for themselves teachers in accordance to their own desires” (2 Tim. 4:3). They’re the people who drift from church to church in search of someone who will tell them what they want to hear—or a congregation that wants a pastor who will make them feel good about themselves instead of preaching the Word and setting a high standard of holiness.

Sometimes resentment toward the Word ceases to be subtle and turns to open hostility. That happened when the crowd Stephen confronted covered their ears, drove him out of the city, and stoned him to death (Acts 7:57-60). Countless others throughout history have felt the fatal blows of those whose resentment of God’s truth turned to hatred for His people.

Receiving the Word includes being quick to hear what it says and slow to anger when it disagrees with your opinions or confronts your sin. Is that your attitude? Do you welcome its reproof and heed its warnings, or do you secretly resent it? When a Christian brother or sister confronts a sin in your life, do you accept or reject their counsel?

Suggestions for Prayer

Thank God for the power of His Word to convict you and drive you to repentance. Welcome its correction with humility and thanksgiving.

For Further Study

Read 2 Timothy 4:1-5, noting the charge Paul gave to Timothy and his reason for giving it

From Drawing Near by John MacArthur Copyright © 1993. Used by permission of Crossway Books, a division of Good News Publishers, Wheaton, IL 60187, www.crossway.com.


Here are some other posts on Anger:

Christian Reflections on Anger

Overcoming 5 Types of Anger

Dealing with Anger? Meditating on Bible Verses from Proverbs

Comfort for the Grieving, Hurting, and Dying Series – Part IV

Devotional Thought for Today – 04/05/2021

Comfort for the Grieving, Hurting, and Dying Series – Part IV

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As we continue this series, today will look at the second stage of the  5 Stages of Grief, ANGER. I remember one being told that “a good Christian never get angry” and being a young immature believer I thought that to be true, NOT!!! Christ was angry, are we not to follow His example? The difference is He had and so should we righteous anger at things that were an abomination against the Law(s) of God. One of the best explanations for this can be found here.

A hot-tempered person stirs up conflict, but the one who is patient calms a quarrel. Proverbs 15:18

Of course in the grief process, the Anger with which we are concerned is slightly different. After the initial onslaught of emotions, including phase 1, denial, usually comes anger. Folks can be angry at any number of people or things and their anger can range from pent-up emotions to physical outbursts. Their anger is a result of their having lost control of the situation.

Some typical objects of anger are:

  • Themselves – Why couldn’t I help, I could have been there, I could have done something…
  • God -Why would God allow that to happen?
  • The deceased, or infirmed – How could they leave me?
  • The healthcare providers – They could have done more, they didn’t do enough, …
  • Hospitals – The VA *^#*^, We should never have admitted them there,
  • Anyone Offering Help – You don’t understand, you can’t know how I am feeling

Some Symptoms of Anger to look for are:

  • Irritability especially if it gets very bad
  • Ongoing preoccupation about what happened and why
  • Addictive or harming behaviors to self or others
  • Anxiety, Fear, Depression
  • There may be behavioral overreactions(outburst)

What can we do?

Again I can only go off my years first in counseling and then the practical application of all I learned when I have counselled others:

  • First is empathy and not simple sympathy especially in this stage. Someone who is angry even if not at you can easily turn on you (see last point above.
  • Second, allow the person to be angry, they need to get it out and not internalize it so it festers and grows malignant. Now of course we do not want them acting out harmful anger at themselves or others.
  • Try and ask probing questions, with grace and CAUTION, to get to the root of the anger, why are they angry, what is the true source of their anger.
  • If possible, offer to help them face the challenge, pray with them at a bedside, hold a prayer service, escort them to a funeral or gravesite, maybe speaking with hospital administration or a doctor…
  • Of course, if they seem stuck in the anger stage of grief, we need to make every effort to refer them to a certified Christian therapist, grief counselor, or psychologist.

Remember our job is to provide Care, Comfort, and (Short Term) Counsel while these individuals are assigned to us. We are not (at least most are not) long-term counselors, let us leave that to those professionals and be what God has called us to be Ministers/Chaplains.

Other Resources:

Dealing with Sorrow

Devotional Thought for Today – 04/01/2021

Comfort for the Grieving, Hurting, and Dying Series – Part II

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Yesterday, we began this series by explaining the goal to be: to attempt to write a series of posts using mainly the Psalms as text that can be used to provide comfort to those Comfort for the Grieving, Hurting, and Dying. This was mainly to be from a Chaplain/Ministerial view but hopfully applicalble and helpfull to all.

For me, as a Christian Chaplain, all roads lead to Christ so our first post began with a quick look at Christ, the Great Physician. I can not imagine trying to comfort someone who is completely against the Bible (think Richard Dawkins) with scripture. So the first thing is a triage of sorts to find out about them. As I should have noted yesterday this is not a CONFRONTATION, but a friendly get-to-know-you session. Remember the goal, mission call it what you will of the minister/chaplain is to provide care, comfort, and counsel.

Lamentations 3:31-33

One of the first lessons I learned when dealing with those “suffering” was they are grieving. No matter the person or situation, loss of job, divorce, illness, death, etc. grief is inevitably involved. I began my Chaplaincy working with the incarcerated and even the toughest of those men and women, grieve (even if they don’t show it). Having a right understanding of the grief process is critical to ministering to them.

When I began my journey I was told and taught there were 5 Stages of Grief:

  • denial
  • anger
  • bargaining
  • depression1
  • acceptance

1 Note some modern text now add two other stages in-between depression and acceptance. They are 1) The Upward Turn– This is where you finally begin to feel better and see the light 2) Reconstruction and Working Through – begins to start to work through the aftermath of loss and take control of your life.

The highlighted link above gives an expanded explanation of each stage. What is important is after meeting and “triaging” a person to understand what stage they are in. It is completely different talking to someone who is in the anger stage after a bitter divorce compared to someone who has just lost a loved one to cancer.

One common denominator in all grief counseling I have encountered is the lack of control someone feels. A common theme is “I could have or should have done…” Even if they do not directly blame themselves they feel a sense of loss of control so great it can in a sense paralyze them emotionally and even physically. That is where we as ministers/chaplains come in to provide that care/comfort and counsel helping them get through their situation.

One last reminder, as noted yesterday, that going it alone should never be an option for anyone. Be sure if you are not a Minister/Chaplain are experiencing grief, are hurting, or have suicidal thoughts you seek help immediately. see links here.

RESOURCES:

C.S. Lewis and the Five Stages of Grief

How to Cope with Grief

Understanding the Grieving Process – Focus on the Family

A Biblical Model of Grieving

Understanding and Recognizing the 7 Stages of Grief

Devotional Thought for Today – 03/20/2021

God is the one who dishes out justice, let Him handle it! - Psalm 37:8-9 eCard - Free Facebook Greeting Cards Online

PSALM 37

SUBJECT. The great riddle of the prosperity of the wicked and the affliction of the righteous, which has perplexed so many, is here dealt with in the light of the future; and fretfulness and repining are most impressively forbidden. It is a Psalm in which the Lord hushes most sweetly the too common repinings of his people and calms their minds as to his present dealings with his own chosen flock, and the wolves by whom they are surrounded. It contains eight great precepts, is twice illustrated by autobiographical statements, and abounds in remarkable contrasts.

DIVISION. The Psalm can scarcely be divided into considerable sections. It resembles a chapter of the book of Proverbs, most of the verses being complete in themselves. It is an alphabetical Psalm: in somewhat broken order, the first letters of the verses follow the Hebrew alphabet. This may have been not only a poetical invention but a help to memory. The reader is requested to read the Psalm through without comment before he turns to our exposition… C.H. Spurgeon

Our text today v.8-9 imparts an important principle for all believers. Worthless or unrighteous anger, and how to deal with it.

Before I continue I want to make sure we understand that righteous anger is not forbidden in the bible. We should be angry at abortion, same-sex unions, LBGTQ stuff, the lack of Christian fighting the good fight, etc. 

Here v.8, the psalmist is saying stop being so angry at these rich evil men or at God for allowing them to be in power. Remember pent-up anger can turn to wrath and that can lead to ungodly acts of rage. In v.9, we find a twofold promise. Those who do evil will be cut off from the eternal kingdom and those that wait upon the Lord, they shall inherit the earth.

They shall inherit the earth. He means that they shall live in such a manner as that the blessing of God shall follow them, even to the grave. John Calvin.

The “Christian” that says I never get angry or it’s a sin to do so, is either not living or never read the book. Most “stuff” in the world today really makes me mad, and Jesus certainly got mad more than 0nce. Yet the Bible is clear Ephesians 4:26–27 says, “Be angry and do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger, and give no opportunity to the devil” (ESV). We are to be angry at the immorality, the unethical behaviors around us without sinning. 

Today’s Prayer

Lord, whenever I see injustice and unbiblical acts I can easily become angry.  Far too often, I keep this anger within, this affects me and those around me.  It prevents me from serving and glorifying you. Help me Lord, to have this righteous anger yet never sin.  To understand your promises concerning those who do evil and to pray for their souls. Teach me to respond to others with graciousness and love.  In the name of Jesus I pray – Amen. 


“What does it mean to not let the sun go down on your anger?”

 

Gage’s physical and mental health were connected

“I think it’s important for me to tell my story because there’s a lot of people out there ready to give up. There’s a lot of guys who are hurting. It doesn’t matter how beat down you are, if you can still breathe, man, just keep getting up.”

Make the Connection

Video: Gage’s physical and mental health were connected

In the Air Force, Gage was able to become the fittest and strongest he had ever been. Unfortunately, arthritis started holding him back and eventually sent him home. After reconnecting with family membersfriends, a church community, and other Veterans, Gage found a new purpose. “It’s the reconnection with Vets that helps me the most.”

Watch Now

Devotional Thought for Today – 10/23/2020

angry emoji - Bing images | Angry emoji, Cool emoji, Funny emoji

PSALM 4 

Anger is a natural outpouring if the unregenerate man. Here in Psalm 4 David begins by with a prayer, begging God to deal with his enemies v.1-3.  When we get to v.4 David instructs his enemies to turn (repent) from their anger Be angry,2 and do not sin; (ESV); turning to God v.5.  David concludes v.6-8 by praises and expressing his trust in God. 

In the New Testament Paul writes to the church at Ephesus the about the same subject Ephesians 4:26-31, making it clear that righteous anger (we should be angry with abortions, LBGT, Suppression of Christianity, ETC.) yet in our anger we must;  do no sin; do not let your anger [cause you shame, nor allow it to] last until the sun goes down. In other words our anger must be biblically based. Does the object of our anger go against the expressed word of God?  

Oh there will be occasions when the neighbor blasts their music to load, or has a messy yard or some other such thing that will upset you.  Maybe you come home after a long hard day at work and the washer overflows. Reasons to be upset maybe reasons to lash out (anger must be biblically based) not at all. 

Yet in the end our human nature may take over and Anger would seem to be unavoidable. It is how we act in our anger that makes all the difference.  Will people, (family, feinds, co-workers) see us as just another fake Christian or will they see us a a reflection of the Light of Christ? 

 

Living the New Life in Christ

32 And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ's sake hath forgiven you. Ephesians 4:32

CONTEXT: 

In this 4th chapter of his Epistle to the church at Ephesus, Paul begins v.1-16 with an exhortation to Christian Unity. In v.17-24 we find his opening of today’s theme Living the New Life in Christ where Paul emphasizes putting away the old life and adopting the new life wrapped in the likeness of God. 

In order to get to pour main text above I need to again put it in context of the whole with which it was written v.25-32:

25 Therefore, putting away lying, speak the truth, each one to his neighbor,[j] because we are members of one another. 26 Be angry and do not sin.[k] Don’t let the sun go down on your anger, 27 and don’t give the devil an opportunity.28 Let the thief no longer steal. Instead, he is to do honest work with his own hands, so that he has something to share with anyone in need29 No foul language should come from your mouth, but only what is good for building up someone in need,[l]so that it gives grace to those who hear.30 And don’t grieve God’s Holy Spirit. You were sealed by him[m] for the day of redemption. 31 Let all bitterness, anger and wrath, shouting and slander be removed from you, along with all malice. 32 And be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving one another, just as God also forgave you[n] in Christ (CSB)

Efesios 4:25-32 Reina-Valera 1960 (RVR1960)

If we just take v.32 it sounds goo, in fact I am sure many of us have heard if said by non-believers accusingly something like; ‘I thought you Christians were supposed to be king and caring full of forgiveness.’  

So how is it “we Christians” can answer those accusations? Paul tells us in the text: 

Always speak the truth to our neighbors.

If you get angry (natural for all men) do not let it cause you to sin.

Do not give the devil a toe hold in your life. If you are angry at someone deal with it Matthew 18:15 (note while this addresses Christian brothers it is applicable to all)

Work hard and share with those in need. Haters will always be out there, but it is hard to argue with hard work and caring. (Matthew 25:40)

We (God’s Chosen Elect) Christians are indwelled by the Holy Spirit (Romans 8:9) the Third person of the Triune Godhead. As such He cannot abide with sin Psalm 5:4 says For you are not a God who delights in wickedness; evil cannot dwell with you. By putting away sin that is making every effort not to sin and when we do to quickly confess our sins, we avoid Grieving the Holy Spirit 

Finally whatever comes out of our mouths must be Graceful to the hearers. You do not want folks hearing you trash talk others, curse and carry on. In all our speech Glorify God.

APPLICATION

We cannot on our own do any of this. That is (in my opinion) why Paul reminds the Church at Ephesus to Unify in fellowship and as individuals to put on the new life in Christ. Our strength to defeat our old ways and the devils temptations comes not from self but from God and fellowship with like minded brethren.

Tempted

When we think of being tempted we think of doing things wrong that is sinning against God. Of course that is true, and we need to Armor Up daily to fight off the willy temptations of the devil what other types of temptations are running about especially with the COVID-19 situation? How about:

Anger – maybe you have been to that store 3 times for TP and they are out every time

Anxiety – some folks get panic attack for many different reasons a world wide pandemic is probably one to set them off

Depression – as more and more areas have issued “Shelter in Place” orders those not used to being “locked up” will become susceptible to depression

Slothfulness or Laziness – as more Americans are laid off laziness is often the by product

Resentment – my neighbor still has a job why not me I have bills to pay too

12 Blessed is the man that endureth temptation: for when he is tried, he shall receive the crown of life, which the Lord hath promised to them that love him. James 1:12

The “GOOD NEWS” is that there is a cure for all these temptations and the cure is Christ. Trust in HIM and HIM alone as not only your Savior equally important LORD of your Life. Christ is able to sustain us through all life’s trials and temptations Psalm 55:22

If you are feeling any of these emotions and want to talk, vent or otherwise express yourself PLEASE feel free to email me and I will gladly send you IM info.

 

 

Christian Reflections on Anger

This article reminded me that many people including “Christians” deal with anger issues every day. Some, like mine are brought on by past military duties, some by abuse, and some for other unnamed reasons. We must first recognize that anger is real an issue, that we can not fix it alone, and having anger issues does not mean someone is a “bad” person. It just means they are a person in need of help or maybe a person in need of Christ. – Mike

Christian Reflections on Anger

by 

Recently, I preached a sermon on anger (Matthew 5:21-26). As a result, I’ve been thinking more about this emotion. I want to share some of my imperfect reflections. This list is not exhaustive, but are just some things that came to mind. You can find them below.

In no particular order:

1. There’s a difference between righteous anger and unrighteous anger.

Is anger always a sin? No. The Bible never says, “Thou shall not get angry.” In fact, the Apostle Paul says, “Be angry, and do not sin. . . ” (Eph. 4:26). So anger can be bad, but it is not always bad. That means we must differentiate between righteous anger and unrighteous anger.

Righteous anger is when you get angry toward sin, injustice, and oppression in the world. Take, for example, something like high school bullying or sex trafficking. The thought of these two makes me angry. I don’t think my anger here is sinful because my anger is aligned with the heart of God who himself hates sin, injustice, and oppression.

Unrighteous anger is all other forms of anger. The context of Matthew 5:21-24 is personal anger toward your brother or sister in Christ. Getting angry at petty offenses and slight snubs are not valid forms of anger. We must seek to steward our emotions and channel our anger toward injustice in the world. The heart of the Christian is to pray, “Lord, help me to love what you love, and hate what you hate.”

Continued at link above

Am I More Righteous than God?

Image result for Jonah 4:2 Amplified Bible

I am guessing everyone has some basic knowledge of the story of Jonah. In the lead up to Chapter 4 God has asked Jonah to God to Nineveh and warn the people there to repent. Jonah of course does everything he can to avoid this task against his sworn enemies but eventually ends up there with God’s intervening hand. Of course the people of Nineveh repent and Jonah is rippin mad at God!

Before we go further please stop a moment and think on the title of this devotion, Am I More Righteous than God? As we will see in the verses that is exactly what Jonah’s anger and pity party amount to. He decided he knew better than God. The same applies TODAY, anytime we take the inerrant, infallible Word of God and twist it to our own liking we are saying I More Righteous than God? I do not know about you but in the day when every knee shall bow do you really want to be the one standing there saying ‘you ain’t all that’?

But it greatly displeased Jonah and he became angry. He prayed to the Lord and said, “O Lord, is this not what I said when I was still in my country? That is why I ran to Tarshish, because I knew that You are a gracious and compassionate God, slow to anger and great in lovingkindness, and [when sinners turn to You] You revoke the [sentence of] disaster [against them]Therefore now, O Lord, just take my life from me, for it is better for me to die than to live.” Then the Lord said, “Do you have a good reason to be angry?”

Then Jonah went out of the city and sat east of it. There he made himself a shelter and sat under its shade so that he could see what would happen in the city. So the Lord God prepared a [a]plant and it grew up over Jonah, to be a shade over his head to spare him from discomfort. And Jonah was extremely happy about [the protection of] the plant. But God prepared a worm when morning dawned the next day, and it attacked the plant and it withered. When the sun came up God prepared a scorching east wind, and the sun beat down on Jonah’s head so that he fainted and he wished to die, and said, “It is better for me to die than to live.”

Then God said to Jonah, “Do you have a good reason to be angry about [the loss of] the plant?” And he said, “I have a [very] good reason to be angry, angry enough to die!” 10 Then the Lord said, “You had compassion on the plant for which you did not work and which you did not cause to grow, which came up overnight and perished overnight. 11 Should I not have compassion on Nineveh, the great city in which there are more than 120,000 [innocent] persons, who do not know the difference between their right and left hand [and are not yet accountable for sin], as well as many [blameless] animals?” Jonah 4:1-11 (AMP)

For context I have included the whole discourse between Jonah and God but I will only concentrate on the first four verses this morning. 

v.1 But it greatly displeased Jonah- God send you on a task, he gives you purpose in life and your response is to be displeased and worse he became angry. Jonah was not angry at himself he was angry at God.  

1. angry–literally, “hot,” probably, with grief or vexation, rather than anger [FAIRBAIRN]. How sad the contrast between God’s feeling on the repentance of Nineveh towards Him, and Jonah’s feeling on the repentance of God towards Nineveh. Strange in one who was himself a monument of mercy on his repentance! We all, like him, need the lesson taught in the parable of the unforgiving, though forgiven, debtor ( Matthew 18:23-35 ). Jonah was grieved because Nineveh’s preservation, after his denunciation, made him seem a false prophet [CALVIN]. But it would make Jonah a demon, not a man, to have preferred the destruction of six hundred thousand men rather than that his prophecy should be set aside through God’s mercy triumphing over judgment. And God in that case would have severely chastised, whereas he only expostulates mildly with him, and by a mode of dealing, at once gentle and condescending, tries to show him his error. Moreover, Jonah himself, in apologizing for his vexation, does not mention the failure of his prediction as the cause: but solely the thought of God’s slowness to anger. This was what led him to flee to Tarshish at his first commission; not the likelihood then of his prediction being falsified; for in fact his commission then was not to foretell Nineveh’s downfall, but simply to “cry against” Nineveh’s “wickedness” as having “come up before God.” Jonah could hardly have been so vexed for the letter of his prediction failing, when the end of his commission had virtually been gained in leading Nineveh to repentance. This then cannot have been regarded by Jonah as the ultimate end of his commission. If Nineveh had been the prominent object with him, he would have rejoiced at the result of his mission. But Israel was the prominent aim of Jonah, as a prophet of the elect people. Probably then he regarded the destruction of Nineveh as fitted to be an example of God’s judgment at last suspending His long forbearance so as to startle Israel from its desperate degeneracy, heightened by its new prosperity under Jeroboam II at that very time, in a way that all other means had failed to do. Jonah, despairing of anything effectual being done for God in Israel, unless there were first given a striking example of severity, thought when he proclaimed the downfall of Nineveh in forty days, that now at last God is about to give such an example; so when this means of awakening Israel was set aside by God’s mercy on Nineveh’s repentance, he was bitterly disappointed, not from pride or mercilessness, but from hopelessness as to anything being possible for the reformation of Israel, now that his cherished hope is baffled. But GOD’S plan was to teach Israel, by the example of Nineveh, how inexcusable is their own impenitence, and how inevitable their ruin if they persevere. Repenting Nineveh has proved herself more worthy of God’s favor than apostate Israel; the children of the covenant have not only fallen down to, but actually below, the level of a heathen people; Israel, therefore, must go down, and the heathen rise above her. Jonah did not know the important lessons of hope to the penitent, and condemnation to those amidst outward privileges impenitent, which Nineveh’s preservation on repentance was to have for aftertimes, and to all ages. He could not foresee that Messiah Himself was thus to apply that history. A lesson to us that if we could in any particular alter the plan of Providence, it would not be for the better, but for the worse [FAIRBAIRN].¹

v.2- You are a gracious and compassionate God- Yes folks this is the very best reason one can have to be mad at God, the fact that He is slow to anger and great in lovingkindness. All because Jonah knows God forgives the sins of those who repent of their evil ways. Obviously Jonah had never sinned in his life, yeah right!!

my saying what I said–my thought, or feeling.
fled before I ranI anticipated by fleeing, the disappointment of my design through Thy long-suffering mercy.
gracious . . . and merciful, &c.–Jonah here has before his mind Exodus 34:6 ; as Joel ( Joel 2:13) in his turn quotes from Jonah. ¹

v.3 – take my life from me- Jonah throws the ultimate pity party and asks God to kill him. Why because he is suffering greatly from some incurable disease or maybe he is like Job and has lost everything in his life? No Jonah has only delivered a message of hope to the enemies of Israel and they have turned from their evil ways. One would think his reaction would be to rejoice. 

Jonah’s impatience of life under disappointed hopes of Israel’s reformation through the destruction of Nineveh, is like that of Elijah at his plan for reforming Israel ( 1 Kings 18:1-46 ) failing through Jezebel ( 1 Kings 19:4 ). ¹

v.4 – Do you have a good reason to be angry? God asks Jonah what reason do you have to be angry? Can there be any justification for your anger? Is it righteous anger? For those of us who deal with anger issues these are all questions we need to be asking every time that monster rears its ugly head. One thing is for certain Anger against a  gracious and compassionate God, (who is) slow to anger and (shows) great  lovingkindness is never justified. 

 Doest thou well to be angry?–or grieved; rather as the Margin, “Art thou much angry,” or “grieved?” [FAIRBAIRN with the Septuagint and Syriac]. But English Version suits the spirit of the passage, and is quite tenable in the Hebrew [GESENIUS]. ¹

The application or lesson here is that God is God, He decides whom to send, whom to save, and what the circumstances for each will be. In other words God is all powerful (omnipotent) secondly and most importantly (in my opinion) God is sovereign that is He is in control of all things and His plan and ways are better than ours. If for example Jonah had considered this and accepted it he would not have complained. He may not have “liked” having to go to the Ninevites but he would have accepted God’s will.

Anytime we superimpose our will, our desires above God’s we are making the claim that we are more righteous than God and I dare say I would be afraid to go there. 

¹ = Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible