Devotional Thought for Today – 10/15/2020

Matthew 6:27 – The Bible Wallpapers

AMP and RVR 1960


In Matthew 6:25–34, we find the portion of the Sermon on them Mountwhere Jesus deals with Anxiety

Basically His advise if you will is what good is there in worrying?  In other words how does it benefit you?  In v.25 He asks is life not more than the temporal (food, clothing and shelter) are we not to live for the eternal? In v.26 He notes, all that God does for nature and how much more will He do for His chosen? Finally in our text, what is it you hope to gain? Will worry and extend our lives? 

No matter the situation, no matter the problems of life God is in control and His shoulders are big enough for all our burdens.

Overwhelmed by God

The Master's Seminary Blog

Overwhelmed by God

Jeremy Peters | 

Overwhelmed is a strong word that many of us can resonate with. Written into this word is imagery of capture—of being crushed. The word overwhelmed itself paints the picture of a boat being careened by a wave of water: completely submerged, buried, and smothered in drowning and disorientation.

But the sense of this word has expanded beyond waves and boats. Armies are said to have won an overwhelming victory when they overpower a weaker opponent. A man who loses his wife to cancer can rightly be said to be overwhelmed with grief. A small child surrounded by strangers in a crowded terminal can be overwhelmed with fear. Whatever the context, this word creates a sense of going under, of losing control, and of being subdued beneath something or someone stronger and bigger.

But does being overwhelmed have to be negative? Can you be overwhelmed by positive emotions, thoughts, or affections?

Anyone who has been on the water knows that a boat’s stability depends primarily upon where its bow is facing. In the same way, what you are overwhelmed by is primarily determined by what you are focused upon. It’s a matter of perspective. Of course, when you are focused on the troubles in front of and around you, feelings of despair can begin to overwhelm. But if you are able to set your mind on things above, the nature and character of God may begin to overwhelm you.

Set Your Eyes on Him, Not Your Trouble

David was a man of many troubles. As a shepherd, wild animals and the elements pursued him. A Philistine giant laughed in his face, eager to make David into an example. The paranoid and jealous Saul relentlessly sought his life. And his was the daunting task of leading Israel into battle against her restless enemies.

While the exact situation that led David to write Psalm 144 is a mystery, the psalm clearly speaks of trouble. In verses 7 and 11, David pleaded with God to rescue and deliver him. He described his surroundings as great waters and the hands of hostile nations surrounding him. In verse 8, he complained about the lies and deceptions his enemies employed against him. But despite the troubles surrounding David, he resolved not to be overwhelmed. He chose to look elsewhere—to gaze upward. And as a result, he was overwhelmed in a different way.

David begins this psalm amidst his troubles with a declaration of praise and worship to God: “Blessed be Yahweh!” In the midst of his trials, David bowed before God in humble recognition that God is the great I AM. He is the eternal, unchanging, self-sufficient God. He simply IS. He depends on nothing and no one. He has no lack and requires no help. He is the source of all other beings and existence. By Him, through Him, and to Him all things were created. He is Yahweh.

He Is Nearer and Greater

Then, with his eyes turned heavenward, David burst forth in what he knew to be true of God. David fills his praise with “My…my…my” to express the personal nearness in which he knew God. Yahweh was a present help in David’s trouble (Ps. 46:1). While the great waters of danger encompassed him (v. 7), God surrounded him even closer. Though his enemies’ hands swarmed him like the mob, God held him even tighter. God had set upon him a steadfast, uncompromising lovingkindness—His covenantal, unconditional love. This was a love not even David deserved.


In the midst of his turmoil and inadequacy,
David experienced an overwhelming nearness to God 


David also paints an overwhelming picture of God’s greatness. He describes God as an immovable security, a towering shelter. In the midst of trouble, David remembers that God is a place of hiding and safety from all the impending attacks. When David had hidden from Saul in rocky caves (1 Sam. 22:1), he knew his true Rock was Yahweh. God was his secret escape—like a fortress or stronghold nestled in the mountains. He was a harbor of protection amidst the wind and waves. As David’s closest companion in battle, God was his shield. It was God who taught David’s hands and fingers to wage his wars and fight his battles. Though David was king of Israel, Yahweh was his sovereign.

In summary, David saw God as his Deliverer—his Protector and Rescuer. Yahweh is a great God!

Be Surprisingly Overwhelmed

What depth of truth! What wonderful declarations of God! Note how David responds in verse 3–4: “O Yahweh, what is man, that You take knowledge of him? Or the son of man, that You think of him? Man is like a mere breath; His days are like a passing shadow.” David wasn’t overwhelmed by the troubles around him. He wasn’t paralyzed by the great waters nor the mob of enemy hands pressing in around him. He was overwhelmed by the splendor and glory of God.

As David turned his eyes upward in the midst of his troubles, his enemies suddenly seemed less daunting when juxtaposed with the greatness of God. He was brought to a place of focusing on the grace and greatness of the One by whom he was known. David was humbled that he would even be considered by such Majesty.

Instead of the normal paralysis that results from troubles, being overwhelmed by God moved David. It moved him to dependent, confident, even bold prayer. He prayed to God as the only One who could rescue him (vv. 5–8, 11). He prayed with a new song in his soul, believing God would be God in his trouble (vv. 9–10). And he approached the throne of grace with boldness, pleading for blessings on Yahweh’s people (vv. 12–15).


Being overwhelmed by God brought David
to his knees—not in paralysis, but desperate boldness 


He was moved to do the one thing that could acquire all that he needed: he prayed.

It is unlikely that anyone reading this has the task of ruling Israel. Nor is it probable that you are being threatened by a hostile army closing in around you. But the principles David demonstrates in this psalm remain applicable even today. When we face troubles, we can begin by turning our eyes to God. We can choose to praise Him amidst the storms of life. Then, the truth of His character can flood our thoughts and remind us that God is nearer and greater than any trouble we might face.

 

When Trouble is Near

Image result for PSALM. 22:11

Don’t be far from me, because distress is near and there’s no one to help. (CSB)

No estés lejos de mí, porque la angustia está cerca, pues no hay quien ayude. (LBLA) 

There is an old adage in the military that goes “there are no atheists in foxholes.” While the exact origins can not be determined the context is pretty clear, in times of extreme duress, fear or stress men (mankind) will turn to (hope in) God to get them out of their present situation. The problem is most don’t give a hoot about God the moment the crisis is over. 

Our Bible verse for today is different. David begins this Psalm asking v.1  My God, my God, why have you abandoned me? Why are you so far from my deliverance and from my words of groaning? Sound familiar, it should this was repeated by our Lord and Savior on the Cross.  David feels alone and abandoned, he has been calling out to God v.2 but appears to ignore his pleas. 

In v.3-8 David recalls, his lowly position in life how he has endured scorn and ridicule, again the parallels to Christ can not be missed. Then in v.9-10 he shifts gears a little and acknowledges God’s divine hand in his life from birth forward. Once again the comparisons to Christ are undeniable. 

Finally in our main text v.11 David cries out:

Don’t be far from me; His fear is that God has abandoned him, his prayer is that He would be near. This should be the daily prayer of every believer, to have God by our side through thick and thin. 

because distress is near; Why do we need God near, because distress or trouble is always nearby. 1 Peter 5:8 Be sober-minded, be alert. Your adversary the devil is prowling around like a roaring lion, looking for anyone he can devour. Listen the devil is not about to come up introduce himself and say I am hear to make you do sinful (evil) things. Trouble come in many forms and many are so sneaky and underhanded your are not even aware your doing something wrong until it is too late.  

and there’s no one to help; Who are you going to call on, that neighbor or family member or battle buddy that is living in the world? Yes I know as Christians we have a Church family we can count on BUT nothing compares to the helper we have in Christ  John 14:16 (AMP) And I will ask the Father, and He will give you another Helper (Comforter, Advocate, Intercessor—Counselor, Strengthener, Standby), to be with you forever— 

I encourage you as did the Psalmist (105:4) to daily; Seek the LORD and his strength; seek his face always.


RESOURCES:
Charles H. Spurgeon’s Treasury of David Psalm 22