Daily Devotional – Rich, Poor, Enemies or Friends

The book of Provers is a contrast between Wisdom and Folly.  The same can be said for someone who only prays for those they love, their own needs, or  never those around them. 

Pray The Bible: Promoting, Encouraging, and Assisting God's People in Biblical Prayer

DAILY DEVOTIONAL FOR DEC 31, 2020

Pray for the Rich and the Poor; your Enemies and your Friends

For those who are rich and prosperous in the world, some of whom perhaps need prayers as much as those who request them.

Lord, keep those who are rich in this present age from being haughty and setting their hopes on the uncertainty of riches, and give them to trust in God, who richly provides us with everything to enjoy: That they may do good and be rich in good works, generous and ready to share; that they may store up treasure for themselves as a good foundation for the future. 1 Timothy 6:17-19(ESV)

Though it is hard for those who are rich to enter into the kingdom of heaven, yet with you this is possible. Matthew 19:24-26(ESV)

For those who are poor and in affliction, for such we have always with us.

Lord, make those who are poor in the world rich in faith and heirs of the kingdom, James 2:5(ESV) and give to them to receive the gospel.

O that the poor of the flock may wait upon you and may know the word of the LORD. Zechariah 11:11(ESV)

Many are the afflictions of the righteous; good Lord, deliver them out of them all. Psalm 34:19(ESV) And though for the moment all affliction seems painful rather than pleasant; nevertheless, later let it yield the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it. Hebrews 12:11(ESV)

Pray for the least of these Matthew 25:31-46 (added by me) 

For our enemies and those who hate us.

Lord, give us to love our enemies, to bless those who curse us, and to pray for those who despitefully use us and persecute us. Matthew 5:44(ESV)

Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do; Luke 23:34(ESV) and do not hold their malice against them; Acts 7:60(ESV) and work in us a disposition to bear with others and forgive in love, Colossians 3:13(ESV) as you require we should whenever we pray. Mark 11:25(ESV)

And grant that our ways may so please the LORD, that even our enemies may be at peace with us. Proverbs 16:7(ESV)

Let the wolf dwell with the lamb, Isaiah 11:6(ESV) and let there be none to hurt or destroy in all your holy mountain; Isaiah 11:9(ESV) let Ephraim not be jealous of Judah, nor Judah harass Ephraim. Isaiah 11:13(ESV)

For our friends and those who love us.

And we wish for all those whom we love in truth, that all may go well with them and that they may be in good health; we especially pray that it may go well with their souls. 2 John 1:2(ESV)

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with their spirits. Philemon 1:25(ESV)

Daily Devotional – Suffered A While

1 Peter 5:10 – Kisha's Daily Devotional

1 Peter 5:10 (AMP and RVR 1960) 


BACKGROUND:

Some of y’all maybe old enough to remember the song Poor, Poor Pitiful Me, By Linda Ronstadt that was released back in 1977 and later covered in 2009 by Terri Clark in 1996. It is the story of a young singer who heads to Hollywood to make her fortune only to run into the manipulating men running the industry at the time. Here are the lyrics, out of this suffering and abuse somes a story that she just has to tell, in this case by way of a song. 

So too, as Christians, we must be every ready to tell the stories God has given us.

First of course is the Gospel story, this is NOT our testimony it is all about GOD. One of the best summaries of the Gospels I have found is from John Piper, A Six-Point Summary of the Gospel, is easy to remember and simple to communicate. 

Second as Ms. Ronstadt song portrays we need to tell our personal (testimony) story, 1 Peter 3:15.


CONTEXT:

Peter ends his 1st epistle by addressing the church body in two elements, first the elders 1 Peter 5:1-4, and then the younger or more immature believers 1 Peter 5:5-9.

To the elders he exhorts them and encourages them to be strong leaders for the flock they have been given charge of by God’s decree.

To the body of believers, he says LISTEN to your elders, obey them (as long as they are giving command that are biblical), be humble, persevere and cast your woes upon Christ.


BREAKDOWN:

And after you have suffered a little while,  Christians have been promised suffering. WHAT?  I am not going to list the many verses found in the NT alone but here is one example Acts 14:22 …“It is through many tribulations and hardships that we must enter the kingdom of God.”

the God of all grace, Christians have been promised God will intervene, for it is nothing but the Grace of God that will suffice to overcome trials and tribulations

who has called you He will intervene for those whom He has called, 2 Timothy 1:9 and choosen Matthew 22:14 

to his eternal glory in Christ, We have been called not for earthly purposes (yet we are to accomplish things until our time ends here) but for eternal glory in Christ 

will himself Eternity with GOD will be amazing, beyond our comprehension. Peter mentions four things that will happen to us in eternity.

Okay, I want to deviate (JUST A LITTLE), as we look at them and and think for a moment when we have come out of a difficult time of suffering.

restore, The King James says “perfect us” God will make us whole physically, mentally and spiritually.  

confirm, or settle the union of Christ in and with us in glory

strengthen, Both our resolve and any area which we were weak will be gone as we are hence completely renewed in glory 

and establish you. that is to place all our focus and being upon the King of Kings, Lord of Lords, the Alpha and Omega. Our only “mission” in Glory will be to glorify the King Revelation 22:1-5


APPLICATION:

We have set forth and established 3 things today:

    1. Christians will suffer on Earth
    2. Christians need to be ready to tell the Gospel Story and their own testimony
    3. God has promised Eternal Glory in Christ to all His called and chosen

 

I asked however to look at applying the 4 components of 1 Peter 5:10 to when we have come out of a difficult experience. Even though Peter is referring to future Glory, remember how you felt complete, confirm, strengthen, and established, fully renewed and invigorated in the Lord after coming through a rough patch? That my friends is your Poor, Poor Pitiful Me song. Your testimony, that needs to be shared when someone asks ‘what has God done for you lately.’  

 

Was Jesus Poor So We Could Be Wealthy?

Another in the Frequently Abused Verses Series

 

In the lead-up to the Truth Matters conference in October, we will be focusing our attention on the sufficiency, authority, and clarity of Scripture. Of our previous blog series, none better embodies that emphasis than Frequently Abused VersesThe following entry from that series originally appeared on April 5, 2017.. -ed. (For other articles in this series just type Frequently Abused Verses into the search bar on the right)

Was Jesus Poor So We Could Be Wealthy?

by Cameron Buettel / Monday, August 12, 2019

The prosperity gospel is neither a small nor isolated error. The fixation with money and material riches pervades the theology of its adherents, corrupting every aspect of their faith and doctrine. It is a comprehensive lie—one that skews the very nature of the gospel itself, distorting even the Person and work of Christ.

In particular, it assaults the nature of Christ’s atoning work on our behalf. Forgiveness of sins and imputed righteousness are of minor importance at best. Instead, prosperity preachers teach a version of the atonement that serves their material interests. And it all hinges on one verse: “For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though He was rich, yet for your sake He became poor, so that you through His poverty might become rich” (2 Corinthians 8:9).

Here’s how TBN televangelist Joseph Prince explains it:

On the cross, Jesus bore the curse of poverty! That is what the Word of God declares: “For you know the grace [unmerited favor] of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though He was rich, yet for your sakes He became poor, that you through His poverty might become rich.” Read 2 Corinthians 8 for yourself. The entire chapter is about money and being a blessing financially to those who are in need. So don’t let anyone tell you that the verse is referring to ‘spiritual’ riches.” [1]

Prince is partly right—2 Corinthians 8 is about blessing others financially. But his fixation with money forces him to overlook the obvious flaw in his argument—that Paul was exhorting the Corinthians to give for the sake of other Christians in need. Apparently they had not been—as Prince promised his readers—delivered from “the curse of poverty.”

In verse 1 Paul commends the Macedonian Christians for the “wealth of their liberality” that flowed out of their “deep poverty.” Likewise, in verse 7 Paul reminds the Corinthians of their own spiritual riches: “Just as you abound in everything, in faith and utterance and knowledge and in all earnestness and in the love we inspired in you, see that you abound in this gracious [giving] work also.” The Corinthians and Macedonians were wealthy in many ways, just not in the specific way Joseph Prince is.

Phil Pringle, another prosperity preacher and founder of the gigantic C3 Church in Sydney, Australia, leaves no doubt about his interpretation of 2 Corinthians 8:9—going so far as to offer his own paraphrase: “Jesus became poor regarding the wealth of this world on the cross, that those who receive Him may become rich with the wealth of this world.” [2]

Such is the corruption and greed of men like Prince and Pringle, that no subject is off limits in their quest to sanitize and sanctify their perverse love of money. At best, they minimize the forgiveness of sin and the imputation of Christ’s righteousness at the expense of physical health and material wealth. At worst, they do away with the spiritual components of Christ’s atoning work altogether.

That self-absorbed theology collapses under biblical scrutiny. John MacArthur points out the true nature of Christ’s earthly poverty:

This verse is not a commentary on Jesus’ economic status or the material circumstances of His life. . . . The Lord’s true impoverishment did not consist in the lowly circumstances in which He lived but in the reality that “although He existed in the form of God, [He] did not regard equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied Himself, taking the form of a bond-servant, and being made in the likeness of men” (Philippians 2:6–7). [3]

Christ was not a wealthy man, but He wasn’t especially poor, either. The poverty He endured was in contrast to the vast heavenly riches He willingly set aside during His incarnation:

Though as God, Jesus owns everything in heaven and on earth (Exodus 19:5Deuteronomy 10:14Job 41:11Psalm 24:150:121 Corinthians 10:26), His riches do not consist primarily of what is material. The riches in view here are those of Christ’s supernatural glory, His position as God the Son, and His eternal attributes. . . . As the eternal second person of the Trinity, Jesus is as rich as God the Father. To the Colossians Paul wrote, “For in Him [Jesus] all the fullness of Deity dwells in bodily form” (Colossians 2:9), and “[Jesus] is the radiance of [God’s] glory and the exact representation of His nature” (Hebrews 1:3). Arguments for Christ’s eternity and deity are inseparable. Since the Scriptures reveal Him to be eternal, and only God can be eternal, Jesus must be God. Therefore, He owns the universe and everything in it, possesses all power and authority (Matthew 28:18), and is to be glorified and honored (John 5:23Philippians 2:9–11)[4]

Therefore, the riches Christ offers us surpass anything this world can offer. Material blessings don’t merely pale in comparison—they fade into oblivion when contrasted with the vast spiritual riches the Lord supplies. Justification, reconciliation, sanctification, and, eventually, glorification—the eternal benefits of salvation are beyond our comprehension. Peter described them as “an inheritance which is imperishable and undefiled and will not fade away, reserved in heaven for [believers]” (1 Peter 1:4).

And as John MacArthur explains, these are the riches we most desperately require:

Sinners desperately need the riches of Christ because they are spiritually destitute. They are the “poor in spirit” (Matthew 5:3), beggars with nothing to commend themselves. But through salvation, believers are made “heirs of God and fellow heirs with Christ” (Romans 8:17), sharing His riches because they are made “partakers of the divine nature” (2 Peter 1:4). The ultimate goal of their salvation is to be made like Him (1 John 3:2), to reflect His glory in heaven, “so that in the ages to come He might show the surpassing riches of His grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus” (Ephesians 2:7). [5]

Paul anticipated the lies of the prosperity gospel. In his letter to the Philippians, he described its promoters as “enemies of the cross of Christ, whose end is destruction, whose god is their appetite, and whose glory is in their shame, who set their minds on earthly things” (Philippians 3:18-19). He charged the church to avoid such worldly distractions. Instead, Christians must fix their hearts on the eternal riches only Christ can provide.

For our citizenship is in heaven, from which also we eagerly wait for a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ; who will transform the body of our humble state into conformity with the body of His glory, by the exertion of the power that He has even to subject all things to Himself. (Philippians 3:20–21)

 

Neighborly Love

December 18

Psalms 147:6
The Lord lifteth up the meek: he casteth the wicked down to the ground.

The message came to the small town: “I will arrive to select one of you to dine with me. Put on your best behavior. You will be judged accordingly.” The townspeople knew that Jesus was a special man, and so they dressed in their finest clothes. The merchant stood at the front of the line, followed by the carpenter, the tent maker, and the miller. A poor girl came along and tried to get in line. The merchant shoved her aside and called her a name. The carpenter threatened to hit her, and the tent maker pushed her into the dirt. The miller raised a boot to kick her, but stopped. The four men realized that they were being watched. They looked up to see Jesus watching their behavior. Christ stepped forward and took the girl by the hand. He said, “Come. Dine with me.”

To the others, He said, “Depart from me. You know me not, and so I neither know you.”

This story was written about 1700 years ago. Though it is not from the Bible, it reflects well the sentiment of God toward the poor and abused. He will raise up the afflicted, but the abuser will He cast aside. Look kindly upon the poor, viewing them with Christ’s own eyes. Then will He be real in you.

Prayer: In my desire to impress You, Lord, let me not neglect my duty to my neighbor. Stretch forth my hands as You would Your own. Help me to help others. Amen.

From: http://www.crosswalk.com/devotionals

 

 

Prayer is a precious privilege to be enjoyed

October 20, 2017 by Steve Rebus

(Octavius Winslow, “Evening Thoughts”)

What! Is it no privilege to have a door of access ever open to God? Is it no privilege when the burden crushes, to cast it upon One who has promised to sustain?

Continued at Source: Prayer is a precious privilege to be enjoyed

PURITAN QUOTE(S) FOR TODAY – 06 May

MISER

I have gold my hope – Job 31:24

Thou fool – Luke 12:20

A harvest may as well be looked for in a hedge as true grace in a gold-thirsty heart. – John Trapp

The miser deprives himself of this world and God will deprive himself of the next. – Thomas Adams

A poor man wants many things, a rich miser wants everything. – John Boys

Taken from: The Puritans Day by Day © The Banner of Truth Trust 2016

Check out our Faithful Steward Ministry Facebook page and Dr. Martyn Lloyd-Jones excellent, “Walking with God”, daily devotional. Today topic WHEN WE DON’T UNDERSTAND