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‘Theology’ of angry, foul-mouthed Lutheran far from biblical

A self-proclaimed “public theologian” is being taken to task for a profane tweet targeting a Christian businessman whose religious freedoms have been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court.


Trump paving the way – GOP must follow up with
black voters

Republicans have already got black voters on board with them regarding the importance of religion, faith and morality. But they’ve got a big job to change black attitudes about reliance on big government.


Ted Baehr: The Hollywood elite need Jesus

Hollywood turned out to honor its own last weekend – and as usual, the glitterati got political.

 


Heritage finds good and bad in Trump budget

The proposed $4.8 trillion budget proposal from President Donald Trump is being praised for tackling national debt, and for attacking waste and fraud, but a conservative think tank is raising concerns about the proper role of government.


Who gets to make immigration policy?

Immigration enforcement activists support the Trump administration’s lawsuits against two sanctuary entities at opposite ends of the country.


 

Government appeals ruling on refugee resettlement

Cuomo to propose compromise on Global Entry ban

Fall in new cases raises hope in virus outbreak in China

Explosive growth in time spent streaming TV

Senegal leader defends homosexuality law

U.S. Adults See Evangelicals Through a Political Lens – Barna Group

Some disturbing but not surprising information here. 

According to Barna’s categorization, evangelicals only make up about 6 percent of the U.S. population, but has assumed a unique place in national discourse.

The cohort of Christians known as evangelicals has courted controversy, no matter how you slice it—whether evangelicals only make up just 6 percent of the U.S. population (as Barna’s legacy tracking of the group suggests) or whether they comprise a larger share of the public (as other polls, which use different measures, indicate). As the U.S. enters another heated election year, a new Barna report shows Americans seem to increasingly view evangelicals through a political lens, which corresponds with mixed feelings toward this religious group.

Our research has developed a pronounced portrait of this Christian minority over the years (see the About the Research section at the end of this article for more on Barna’s definition of the group), but for this study our aim was different. We set out to understand how the general public perceives evangelicals. (You can read the full Barna Briefing The Brand of Evangelicals, including new commentary from David Kinnaman, via Barna Access.) Based on a nationwide study of U.S. adults, we found that, though many people still view evangelicals as a committed group of believers who put their faith first, their political connotation puts the future of American evangelicalism in a precarious spot.

Continued at Source: U.S. Adults See Evangelicals Through a Political Lens – Barna Group