Devotional Thought for Today – 12/11-2020

Psalm 78 - Springer Road Church of Christ

ESV and RVR 1960

INFORMING THE NEXT GENERATION


CONTEXT (v. 1-31) :  v. 1–8 The introduction to Ps. 78 explains that it is a “parable” (v. 2) intended to exhort the Israelites to not be like their forefathers (v. 8).  In v.5–8 The psalmist describes how God (Ps 78:5) demanded that Israel not only recount His laws and instructions, but also remember the good and bad parts of their history. The Israelites should teach God’s laws and Israel’s history so that each new generation would know not to go astray (v. 8).  Verses 9–16 This section is the first of two thematic overviews in Psa 78 (see vv. 32–41). This section summarizes Israel’s interaction with God during the exodus (Exod 6–12) and then in the wilderness (Exod 14–40Num 11–25).  Here in v.17–20 Israel’s main fault in the episode recalled here was their demand for meat (see Num 11:4–6); however, the psalmist implies that Israel complained against God on a regular basis (compare Exod 16–17Num 11Psa 78:19–20).  In v.21–25 In this section, the psalmist focuses on God’s anger and His provision of manna to Israel. He implies that, although God was furious with Israel, He did not stop providing food for them. This section may be a stylized review of the wilderness journey of Israel, contrasting the reality of God’s continual provision of manna (Exod 16:35) with Israel’s general disloyalty to God.  Finally in v.26–31 The psalmist now switches from focusing on the manna to the quail (see Num 11:31–34). He recounts the incident in which God gave Israel meat to eat but also struck them with a plague. – Faithlife Study Bible


When I was a kid growing up WWII and the Korean War’s were still fresh on the minds on most Americans. Viet Nam was just not really underway in strength and patriotism was abundant. 

I remember sitting for hours listening to some of my neighbors describing both the horrors (concentration camps, artillery bombardments, etc.) and glory (comradery, victory over evil, etc.) that they experienced.  I know in some cases, Mrs. S who was in a concentration camp, Mr. T who was with Patton and liberated said camp(s) talking about the war was quite difficult but they did so so my generation would never repeat the lessons of the past. 

This Plasm, sets out to do the same thing. V.4 We will not hide them from their children, but tell to the coming generation the glorious deeds of the Lord, and his might, and the wonders that he has done. 

We all know Israel’s history with God. It is a history wrought with FAILURE. Failure to obey the one true God of Heaven and Earth,  the great I AM.  The Psalmist is making it clear I/we will not hide those past failure from the next generation otherwise we condemn them to the same mistakes we and our forefathers have made. He implores them to remember the Highs and Lows of their past, leaving nothing out. 

Webster’s 1828 Dictionary defines History as: An account of facts, particularly of facts respecting nations or states; a narration of events in the social justice

order in which they happened, with their causes and effects.

Yet there are many today in America (and other countries) that wish to rewrite history, ( Change the facts) using  names like social justice as a smoke screen for historical revisionism which is a fancy way of saying I/we see history as this so it must be a fact. The would have us believe the Pilgrims came only for profit, that all who fought for the South in the War Between the States were Slave owning racist and so many more lies.  I hope you can see the danger in that, I encourage you to:

    1. Pray for those who would re-write history
    2. Parents, Monitor you children’s school assignments for misinformation  
    3. Encourage Everyone you know to, Inform the Next Generation of our Nations’ True History. n If we love to tell the story of our redeemer we should love to tell the story of the nation he has Graced us with. 

Verse 4. Commentary –  We will not hide from their children, etc. Thou must not only praise God thyself, but endeavour to transmit the memorial of his goodness to posterity. Children are their parent’s heirs; it were unnatural for a father, before he dies, to bury up his treasure in the earth where his children should not find or enjoy it; now the mercies of God are not the least part of a good man’s treasure, nor the least of his children’s inheritance, being both helps to their faith, matter for their praise, and spurs to their obedience. “Our fathers have told us what works thou didst in their days, how thou didst drive out the heathen” etc., Ps 44:1-2; from this they ground their confidence, Ps 44:4, “Thou art my King, O God; command deliverances for Jacob, ” and excite their thankfulness, Ps 44:8, “In God we boast all the day long, and praise thy name for ever.” Indeed, as children are their parents heirs, so they become in justice liable to pay their parents’ debts: now the great debt which the saint at death stands charged with, is that which he owes to God for his mercies, and, therefore, it is but reason he should tie his posterity to the payment thereof. Thus mayest thou be praising God in heaven and earth at the same time. – William Gurnall.