5th Circuit rejects pro-abortion challenges

5th Circuit rejects pro-abortion challenges, Texas heartbeat law scheduled to go into effect Wednesday

In spite of a slew of last-ditch pro-abortion efforts, Texas’s SB 8, which prohibits elective abortions after the preborn child’s heartbeat is detectable, is scheduled to go into effect this Wednesday. More than 20 “abortion providers”  had filed…

SOURCE: 5th Circuit rejects pro-abortion challenges

Two law professors’ amicus brilliantly explains why Roe must go

We pick up today where we left off last week in our series of overviews of important amicus briefs filed in the case of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization which the Supreme Court will hear this fall. We began this series on July 22, and it continues to be well received.

The justices will hear the state of Mississippi defend its ban on abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy with very limited exceptions.  The law was blocked by Judge Carlton W. Reeves of the Federal District Court in Jackson, Mississippi in 2018…

SOURCE: Two law professors’ amicus brilliantly explains why Roe must go

Nancy Pelosi’s Budget Resolution and Infrastructure Bills Will Force Americans to Fund Abortions

The clock is ticking for Congress to fund the federal government for fiscal year 2022. Congress is also moving forward with implementing tax and spending sprees in the $3.5 trillion budget resolution and a $1.1 trillion infrastructure bill. There’s an issue looming large in these major spending bills: the future of longstanding, bipartisan pro-life policy…

Source: Nancy Pelosi’s Budget Resolution and Infrastructure Bills Will Force Americans to Fund Abortions

Taliban is Making Afghan Women and Girls Sex Slaves. And Feminists are Silent?

Twenty years ago, on Sept. 11, 2001, al-Qaeda, with the aid and blessing of Afghan Taliban leaders, planned and carried out the horrifying murder of almost 3,000 Americans. This was not the first attack planned and carried out against Americans by its leader Osama bin Laden—since-killed, courtesy of SEAL Team 6.

When our nation required …

Source: Taliban is Making Afghan Women and Girls Sex Slaves. And Feminists are Silent – LifeNews.com

MIRACLE: Chicago woman rescues newborn abandoned in alley trash

We live in a disposable society, paper plates, trash bags even marriages seem to be acceptable in today’s culture. A human life should NEVER fall into this category.

Stand 4 Life

A newborn who had been abandoned in an alleyway dresser drawer narrowly escaped death when a woman found him while looking for recyclable materials…

Source: MIRACLE: Chicago woman rescues newborn abandoned in alley trash

Hobby Lobby ordered to pay $220K for not allowing trans employee to use women’s restroom

Someone seriously has to explain to me how a biological MALE who used a mensroom for over a decade without any mental distress and now self identifies as a Female is distressed when folks don’t want HIM in a female’s restroom? Especially when the company goes out of it’s way to accommodate the employee. Sorry folks but this is simply illogical never mind an unbiblical attack on religious freedom by the courts.


A state court has ordered the Christian-owned craft store chain Hobby Lobby to pay over $200,000 in fines for refusing to allow one of its trans-identified employees to use the women’s bathroom. 

A three-judge Illinois appellate court panel unanimously ruled Friday that Hobby Lobby violated the Illinois Human Rights Act by declining to allow one of its employees to use the bathroom that corresponds with the person’s gender identity instead of biological sex…

SOURCE: Hobby Lobby ordered to pay…

VETERANS ARE NOT ALONE

The pictures below are strikingly similar and tragic, and many are asking the question how could this great nation repeat the failure of 46 years ago?

Photo Taken Amid Embassy Evacuation Some Call Biden's 'Saigon Moment' Is  Striking

Taken Amid Embassy Evacuation Some Call Biden’s ‘Saigon Moment’ Is Striking 14 Aug 2021 -Business – InsiderPhoto

Fall of Saigon Anniversary: How U.S. Managed Its Vietnam Failure | The New  Republic

Evacuation of US Embassy Saigon 29 April 1975 – NY Daily News

The following is from the Veterans Administration and offers some good counsel for fo those who served in Afgan, or any theater for that matter, I pray it will be of help to you or someone you know:

Veterans may question the meaning of their service or whether it was worth the sacrifices they made. They may feel more moral distress about experiences they had during their service. It’s normal to feel this way. Talk with your friends and families, reach out to battle buddies, connect with a peer-to-peer network, or sign up for mental health services. Scroll down for a list of common reactions and coping advice.

Common Reactions

In reaction to current events in Afghanistan, Veterans may:

  • Feel frustrated, sad, helpless, grief or distressed
  • Feel angry or betrayed
  • Experience an increase in mental health symptoms like symptoms of PTSD or depression
  • Sleep poorly, drink more or use more drugs 
  • Try to avoid all reminders or media or shy away from social situations
  • Have more military and homecoming memories

Veterans may question the meaning of their service or whether it was worth the sacrifices they made. They may feel more moral distress about experiences they had during their service.

Veterans may feel like they need to expect and/or prepare for the worst. For example, they may:

  • Become overly protective, vigilant, and guarded
  • Become preoccupied by danger
  • Feel a need to avoid being shocked by, or unprepared for, what may happen in the future

Feeling distressed is a normal reaction to negative events, especially ones that feel personal. It can be helpful to let yourself feel those feelings rather than try to avoid them. Often, these feelings will naturally run their course. If they continue without easing up or if you feel overwhelmed by them, the suggestions below can be helpful.

Strategies for Managing Ongoing Distress

At this moment, it may seem like all is lost, like your service or your sacrifices were for nothing. Consider the ways that your service made a difference, the impact it had on others’ lives, or on your own life. Remember that now is just one moment in time and that things will continue to change.

It can be helpful to focus on the present and to engage in the activities that are most meaningful and valuable to you. Is there something you can do today that is important to you?  This can be as an individual, a family member, a parent, or a community member. Something that is meaningful to you in regard to your work or your spirituality? Such activities won’t change the past or the things you can’t control, but they can help life feel meaningful and reduce distress, despite the things you cannot change.

It can also help to consider your thinking. Ask yourself if your thoughts are helpful to you right now. Are there ways you can change your thinking to be more accurate and less distressing? For example, are you using extreme thinking where you see the situation as all bad or all good?  If so, try and think in less extreme terms. For example, rather than thinking “my service in Afghanistan was useless” consider instead “I helped keep Afghanistan safe.”

Finally, consider more general coping strategies that you may want to try including:

  • Engage in Positive Activities. Try to engage in positive, healthy, or meaningful activities, even if they are small, simple actions. Doing things that are rewarding, meaningful, or enjoyable, even if you don’t feel like it, can make you feel better.
  • Stay Connected. Spend time with people who give you a sense of security, calm, or happiness, or those who best understand what you are going through.
  • Practice Good Self Care. Look for positive coping strategies that help you manage your emotions. Listening to music, exercising, practicing breathing routines, spending time in nature or with animals, journaling, or reading inspirational text are some simple ways to help manage overwhelming or distressing emotions.
  • Stick to Your Routines. It can be helpful to stick to a schedule for when you sleep, eat, work, and do other day-to-day activities.
  • Limit Media Exposure. Limit how much news you take in if media coverage is increasing your distress.
  • Use a mobile app. Consider one of VA’s self-help apps (see https://www.ptsd.va.gov/appvid/mobile/) such as PTSD Coach which has tools that can help you deal with common reactions like, stress, sadness, and anxiety. You can also track your symptoms over time.
  • PTSD Coach Online. A series of online video coaches will guide you through 17 tools to help you manage stress. PTSD Coach Online is used on a computer, rather than a mobile device, and therefore can offer tools that involve writing.

If you develop your own ways of adapting to ongoing events and situations, you may gain a stronger sense of being able to deal with challenges, a greater sense of meaning or purpose, and an ability to mentor and support others in similar situations.

Resources available right now

Meet Baby Olivia Video

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Baby Olivia Banner

LiveAction has produced a beautiful video that pulls back the curtain on the glories within the womb. In its short three minutes, we’re treated to a portrayal of the first nine months of human life. According to LiveAction, 12 percent of pro-choice people changed their minds after watching, and 37 percent of those already pro-life became “more pro-life.”

SOURCE: LiveAction’s Baby Olivia Video is Compelling

Texas judge denies US citizen due process rights; sends her before Islamic Sharia tribunal instead

Blaze Media

A judge in Texas earlier this year effectively denied a U.S. citizen her constitutionally protected due process rights, choosing instead to order her to appear before an Islamic tribunal where her testimony is considered inferior. And when her lawyers sounded the alarm — the judge doubled down…

SOURCE: Texas judge denies US citizen due process rights