Sunday Sermon Series – The Man of Sorrows and Grief

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Isaiah 53

The Suffering Messiah or Servant is the Major theme of Chapter three. Matthew Henry divides it this way: The person. (1-3) sufferings. (4-9) humiliation, and exaltation of Christ, are minutely described; with the blessings to mankind from his death. (10-12)

In keeping with our ongoing Comfort for the Grieving, Hurting, and Dying Series, the above artwork was in my inbox this morning and of course, just begged to be today’s feature sermon.

Last Sunday, we returned to Lakeshore Baptist Church, Pastor Don Elborne preached a sermon from 1 Peter 2:24 & Galatians 2:20, entitled;  “Were You There When They Crucified My Lord?”. In it, he reminded us of the old Black spiritual of the same name. If you have never heard it, here is the 1899 version (v.1-4), the oldest known written copy as passed down and likely the closest to the original.

1 Were you there when they crucified my Lord? (were you there?)
Were you there when they crucified my Lord? Oh!
Sometimes it causes me to tremble, tremble, tremble.
Were you there when they crucified my Lord?

2 Were you there when they nailed Him to the tree? (to the tree?) Were you there when they nailed Him to the tree? Oh! Sometimes it causes me to tremble, tremble, tremble. Were you there when they nailed Him to the tree?

3 Were you there when they pierced Him in the side? (in the side?) Were you there when they pierced Him in the side? Oh! Sometimes it causes me to tremble, tremble, tremble. Were you there when they pierced Him in the side?

4 Were you there when the sun refused to shine? (were you there?) Were you there when the sun refused to shine? Oh! Sometimes it causes me to tremble, tremble, tremble. Were you there when the sun refused to shine?

5 Were you there when they laid Him in the tomb? Were you there when they laid Him in the tomb? Oh! Sometimes it causes me to tremble, tremble, tremble.
Were you there when they laid Him in the tomb? * Added around 1907

6 Were you there when he rose from out the tomb? Were you there when he rose from out the tomb? O–sometimes it causes me to tremble, tremble, tremble;
Were you there when he rose from out the tomb? * Added around 1950s

No one suffered or grieved on earth more than Christ Jesus. Man cannot even begin to comprehend the weight of all sins bearing down upon him. The inability to grasp this should not deter in fact it should sour us to think about it frequently.


Sermon

The Man of Sorrows

Charles Haddon Spurgeon, March 1, 1873,

Scripture: Isaiah 53:3

From: Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Volume 19


Other Resources:

Surely He Has Borne Our Griefs, John Piper

“Acquainted With Grief”, Oswald Chambers

Why is Jesus referred to as a man of sorrows in Isaiah 53:3

Made Righteous In HIM!

Sunday Sermon Series – Resurrection of Christ

He Is Risen Illustration Free Stock Photo - Public Domain Pictures
https://images.app.goo.gl/iGTNYL4CtYdb17C39

Whether you call it Easter or Resurrection Sunday is not the crux of the matter. Today we celebrate our Risen Savior, Christ Jesus. There would be no other reason to celebrate this or any other day if He were not Alive. Whom do you celebrate and serve today?

Philippians 3:20-21

SERMON

Philippians 3:20-21 – The Power of Christ Illustrated by the Resurrection by C.H. Spurgeon

Other Resources:

The God of Peace Brought from the Dead the Good Shepherd by John Piper

Evidence for the Resurrection by Josh McDowell

Sunday Sermon Series – Christ Invitation

Matthew 11:28 - Bible Quote - Bible Verse Images

Matthew 11

Chapter 11, can be broken down as follows: Christ’s preaching. (1) Christ’s answer to John’s disciples. (2-6) Christ’s testimony to John the Baptist. (7-15) The perverseness of the Jews. (16-24) The gospel revealed to the simple. The heavy-laden invited. (25-30) – Matthew Henry

As Matthew Henry points out our text v.28 is part of the invite to the heavily laden by Christ. There are three quick points I wish to make, that I gleaned from the text before we come on the sermon and other materials:

  • It is only through Christ Alone that the invite can go out
  • The invite is directed only towards those burdened by sins
  • Only Christ, by His atonement at Calvary, can provide rest from that burden

SERMON

Christ’s Invitation by J C Ryle

OTHER RESOURCES

Come – Matthew 11:28 by J C Ryle

Come Unto Me All Ye That Labor Thomas Boston

The Rest of Christ by A W Pink

The Yoke of Christ – Matthew 11:28 by A W Pink

The Present and Future Rest of True Believers – Matthew 11:28 by John Newton

Christ’s Gracious Invitation – Matthew 11:28 by Archibald Alexander

Come, All Who Are Weary Desiring God Ministries

Rest, Rest C.H. Spurgeon

A Knowledge of God By Dr. M. Lloyd-Jones

Sunday Sermon Series – The Guilt and Danger of Such a Nation as This

You may have noticed recently I have been posting many devotional thoughts concerning the trends in America. Here is a sermon from John Newton best known for composing Amazing Grace he was with his friend William Cowper a prolific hymn writer and excellent preacher. 

While Jeremiah was obviously speaking prophetically to the nation of Israel in Chapter 5, every nation that turns its back on the one true God of the universe should be equally forewarned. 

Jeremiah 5:29 Shall I not visit for these things? said the LORD: shall not  my soul be avenged on such a nation as this?

SERMON

The Guilt and Danger of Such a Nation as This

BY JOHN NEWTON

 

THREE times* the Lord God repeats, by his prophet, this alarming question. Their ingratitude and obstinacy were so notorious, their sins so enormous and aggravated, the sentence denounced against them, however severe, was so undeniably just, that, partial as they were to themselves, God is pleased to appeal to their own consciences, and to make them judges in their own cause; inviting, or rather challenging, them, to offer any plea why his forbearance and patience, which they had so long despised, should be still afforded them…

CONTINUED > > 


Today’s Prayer 

Dear God,

We as a nation are in turmoil. We have partisan politics, ungodly laws, and tempers flaring over uncertain times. We ask you, Lord, to dwell among us, to not forsake you remnant, nor lift your hand of divine providence.  We confess our nation’s unworthiness of your mercy. 

We are comforted by the knowledge that You alone are our Savior and Lord, and the sovereign Master of life. We trust our nation to Your loving care, Lord. Send Your Spirit to touch the hearts of our nation’s leaders. Give them the wisdom to know what is right, and the courage to do it. Give us Your light and Your truth to guide us in our ways so that we may seek Your will in our lives and impact the world around us for Your Kingdom. In Jesus’ Name, we pray. Amen 

Modified from: prayer

Sunday Sermon Series – The Indwelling Word

Logos.com

COLOSSIANS 3

The book of Colossians describes Christ as superior to all other teachers, faiths, and philosophies. In this letter, written from prison, Paul once again tackles false teachings. Among these errors claim that Christians need to give up all physical enjoyments, that they should worship angels, and that they need to rely on the wisdom of an elite few. These problems are consistent with an ancient heresy known as Gnosticism. In response, Paul explains that Christ is supreme and sufficient for our salvation.¹

There are two major themes in Chapter 3, Holy Living v.1-17 and Family Relations v.18 -4:1.  Our text comes from the first part. Paul used some strong words (depending on your translation)  put off v.1-4, put to death v.5-7, remove all v.8-9, put on v.9-10, to remind the church at Colossae and us that we are no longer bound to the world and live the life v.11-17 in Christ. 

SERMON

CHRIST’S INDWELLING WORD

DELIVERED BY C. H. SPURGEON
AT THE METROPOLITAN TABERNACLE, NEWINGTON
ON LORD’S-DAY EVENING, APRIL 10, 1881


Other Resources

The Incomparable Christ: Exposition of Colossians: Sing As Though Your Life Depended On ItSermon by Derek Thomas on June 10, 2007

¹ Source

 

SUNDAY SERMON SERIES – The Heart of the Matter

New Day Church Network | Discovering Discipleship (Part 9)

Mark 7

I have written extensively about the “heart” of the man and how messed up it can be, you can search in the box to the right to see the other posts. 

Mark Chapter 7 begins with most modern translations having a heading something similar to;  That which defiles, The Traditions of the Elders, Traditions and Commandments, or my two favorites; Jesus Teaches about Inner Purity (NLT) and Lo que contamina al hombre (What pollutes man) RVR 1960.

Today’s main text comes from Mark 7:14-23, depending on your translation you may have another heading the AMP for example begins the Chapter with Followers of Traditions and adds The Heart of Man.

The world would have us believe that man is essentially good yet the bible and mankind’s everyday actions throughout history would completely contradict that belief. 

Here is Pastor Alistair Begg explaining why:

SERMON

“The Heart of the Matter”

LISTEN or WATCH HERE

 


Other Resources and Sermons:

Mark 7:20-23 – Hideous DiscoveryPDF Sermon by C H Spurgeon

Mark 7:14-23 – All These Evils Come From InsidePDF  Sermon by Kim Riddlebarger

Mark: Clean on the Inside Sermon Derek Thomas

Heart-Surgery Web Page by Samuel Bolton

On the Deceitfulness of the HeartWeb Page by John Newton

 

Sunday Sermon Series – Confession of Sin

Image result for "I Have Sinned" Exodus 9:27

Exodus 9:27, Numbers 22:34, 1 Samuel 15:24, Joshua 7:20, Matthew 27:4, Job 6:20, Luke 15:18

My sermon this morning will have seven texts, and yet I pledge myself that there shall be but three different words in the whole of them; for it so happens that the seven texts are all alike, occurring in seven different portions of God’s holy Word. I shall require, however, to use the whole of them to exemplify different cases; and I must request those of you who have brought your Bibles with you to refer to the texts as I shall mention them…

Confession of Sin – A Sermon with Seven Texts

 

Charles Haddon Spurgeon / January 18, 1857

Scripture: Exodus 9:27/Numbers 22:34/1 Samuel 15:24/ Joshua 7:20/Matthew 27:4/ Job 6:20/ Luke 15:18

From: New Park Street Pulpit Volume 3

 

The Basics of Expository Preaching

Google Expository Preaching and you will find an exhaustive list of responses to the topic. Among them are many varying books and “helps” on the topic of what Expository Preaching is all about.  Most churches that practice “Expositional” preaching that I have been to think this means going through a book verse by verse and explaining it. But does it? Alistair Begg of https://www.truthforlife.org/ shares this easy to understand two-part study on the subject. 

 

— Here on Truth For Life, you’ve likely heard us talk about the importance of expository Bible teaching. But what exactly does that phrase mean? Why does it matter? Get the answers when you listen to Truth For Life with Alistair Begg.

 — Tragically, in many churches today, you’re more likely to hear the pastor’s opinions preached rather than God’s Word. So how do we identify solid Bible teaching? What does it mean to preach directly from Scripture? Discover the answer when you listen to Truth For Life with Alistair Begg!

Sunday Sermon Series – We Preach Christ Crucified

Image result for “We preach Christ crucified.”

Yesterday’s devotional had the same title or theme as of today’s sermon. In it, we covered the details and context of today’s text 1 Corinthians 1:23. I purposely left out these sermons so I could share them and the above quote with you today. I sincerely hope it edifies you and glorifies God. 

SERMONS

PREACHING CHRIST CRUCIFIED

“Whatever others may do, we preach Christ crucified, we dare not, we cannot, and we will not alter the great subject matter of our preaching, Jesus Christ, and Him crucified."

“But we preach Christ crucified.”
1 Corinthians 1:23

NO. 3218 / A SERMON / PUBLISHED ON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1910 DELIVERED BY C. H. SPURGEON/ AT THE METROPOLITAN TABERNACLE, NEWINGTON / ON LORD’S-DAY EVENING, AUGUST 23, 1863

Christ Crucified

Let me very briefly tell you what I believe preaching Christ and him crucified is. My friends, I do not believe it is preaching Christ and him crucified, to give people a batch of philosophy every Sunday morning and evening, and neglect the truths of this Holy Book. I do not believe it is preaching Christ and him crucified, to leave out the main cardinal doctrines of the Word of God, and preach a religion which is all a mist and a haze, without any definite truths whatever. I take it that man does not preach Christ and him crucified, who can get through a sermon without mentioning Christ’s name once; nor does that man preach Christ and him crucified, who leaves out the Holy Spirit’s work, who never says a word about the Holy Ghost, so that indeed the hearers might say, “We do not so much as know whether there be a Holy Ghost.”

“But we preach Christ crucified, unto the Jews a stumblingblock, and unto the Greeks foolishness; but unto them which are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God.” — 1 Corinthians 1: 23- 24.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon / March 14, 1858 /Scripture: 1 Corinthians 1:23-24 / From: Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Volume 46

 

Sunday Sermon Series – Righteous Hatred

10 Ye that love the Lord, hate evil: he preserveth the souls of his saints; he delivereth them out of the hand of the wicked. Psalm 97:10

PSALM 97


CONTEXT

The following is from the Treasury of David by C.H. Spurgeon

SUBJECT. As the fast Psalm sung the praises of the Lord in connection with the proclamation of the gospel among the Gentiles, so this appears to foreshadow the mighty working of the Holy Ghost in subduing the colossal systems of error and casting down the idol gods. Across the sea to maritime regions a voice cries for rejoicing at the reign of Jesus (Ps 97:1), the sacred fire descends (Ps 97:3), like lightning the gospel flames forth (Ps 97:4), difficulties vanish (Ps 97:5), and all the nations see the glory of God (Ps 97:6). The idols are confounded (Ps 97:7), the church rejoices (Ps 98:8), the Lord is exalted (Ps 98:9). The Psalm closes with an exhortation to holy steadfastness under the persecution which would follow, and bids the saints rejoice that their path is bright, and their reward glorious and certain. Modern critics, always intent upon ascribing the psalms to anybody rather than to David, count themselves successful in dating this song further on than the captivity, because it contains passages similar to those which occur in the latter prophets, but we venture to assert theft it is quite as probable that the prophets adopted the language of David as that some unknown writer borrowed from them. One psalm in this series is said to be “in David”, and we believe that the rest are in the same place, and by the same author. The matter is not important, and we only mention it because it seems to be the pride of certain critics to set up new theories, and there are readers who imagine this to be a sure proof of prodigious learning. We do not believe that their theories are worth the paper they are written upon.

DIVISION. The psalm divides itself into four portions, each containing three verses. The coming of the Lord is described (Ps 97:1-3); its effect upon the earth is declared (Ps 97:4-6), and then its influence upon the heathen and the people of God (Ps 97:7-9). The last part contains both exhortation and encouragement, urging to holiness and inculcating happiness (Ps 97:10-12).

EXPOSITION. v.10 Ye that love the Lord, hate evil. For He hates it, his fire consumes it, his lightnings blast it, his presence shakes it out of its place, and his glory confounds all the lovers of it. We cannot love God without hating that which he hates. We are not only to avoid evil, and to refuse to countenance it, but we must be in arms against it, and bear towards it a hearty indignation. He preserveth the souls of his saints. Therefore they need not be afraid of proclaiming war with the party which favours sin. The saints are the safe ones: they have been saved and shall be saved. God keeps those who keep his law. Those who love the Lord shall see his love manifested to them in their preservation from their enemies, and as they keep far from evil so shall evil be kept far from them. He delivereth them out of the hand of the wicked. It is not consistent with the glory of his name to give over to the power of his foes those whom his grace has made his friends. He may leave the bodies of his persecuted saints in the hand of the wicked, but not their souls, these are very dear to him, and he preserves them safe in his bosom. This foretells for the church a season of battling with the powers of darkness, but the Lord will preserve it and bring it forth to the light.  


EXPLANATORY NOTES AND QUAINT SAYINGS

Verse 10. Ye that love the LORD, hate evil. It is evident that our conversion is sound when we loathe and hate sin from the heart: a man may know his hatred of evil to be true, first, if it be universal: he that hates sin truly, hates all sin. Secondly, true hatred is fixed; there is no appeasing it but by abolishing the thing hated. Thirdly, hatred is a more rooted affection than anger: anger may be appeased, but hatred remains and sets itself against the whole kind. Fourthly, if our hatred be true, we hate all evil, in ourselves first, and then in others; he that hates a toad, would hate it most in his own bosom. Many, like Judah, are severe in censuring others (Ge 38:24), but partial to themselves. Fifthly, he that hates sin truly, hates the greatest sin in the greatest measure; he hates all evil in a just proportion. Sixthly, our hatred is right if we can endure admonition and reproof for sin, and not be enraged; therefore, those that swell against reproof do not appear to hate sin.—Richard Sibbes.

Hate evil. Sin seemeth to have its name of sana, anv (the word here used) because it is most of all to be hated, as the greatest evil; as that which setteth us furthest from God the greatest good.—John Trapp.

Get mortifying graces, especially love to God, for those that love the Lord, will hate evil. And the more they love him, the more they will hate it.—David Clarkson.

God is a Spirit, and he looks to our very spirits; and what we are in our spirits, in our hearts and affections, that we are to him. Therefore, what ill we shun, let us do it from the heart, by hating it first. A man may avoid an evil action from fear, or out of other respects, but that is not sincerity. Therefore look to thy heart, see that thou hate evil, and let it come from sincere looking to God. Ye that love the LORD, hate evil, saith David: not only avoid it, but hate it; and not only hate it, but hate it out of love to God.—Richard Sibbes.


SERMON

Click here to view and/or download a PDF version of this sermon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon,  August 8, 1858

Scripture: Psalms 97:10

From: New Park Street Pulpit Volume 4